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Thread: 2nd attempt

  1. #1
    divaskid's Avatar
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    My last spathulata bit the dust and I couldn't ever figure out why, so I got another one in hopes I could do better. This one is called spathulata "frasier island" (tropical). Its a big clump of them and already one has turned brown. I'm worried they all will and I will have waisted my money again.

    Right now theyre in a little tray of purrified water and they get moderate indirect light. I have no idea what theyre potted in but I don't think its that because it was growing well in it when I bought it. Hmmm and humidity is about 60% and temps are around 85-90.

    Any clues as to what is wrong? Or am I just worrying too much, because its only one thats brown, the rest of the clump (of about 15) look okay. THough they don't have dew.

    Ahh, help lol

    Oh and they all have flowers. How do I know when theyre seeds? Do they multiply this way pretty quickly?
    ~Michelle (AKA Geva or Jennifer)

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    Mine likes full direct sun. I think that indirect sunlight is not enough, and as for seeds the frasier island type doesn't make that many seeds for some reason. I only get a few from each flower pod.
    I thought you people where \"Plant Geeks\", Look at me Now...

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    divaskid's Avatar
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    hmmm more sun is probably a good idea. Where I bought it, it was out in the sun and happy

    Does this sundew need any type of dormancy since its a tropical one?

    Thanks for the input peter [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img]
    ~Michelle (AKA Geva or Jennifer)

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    It's possible that the particular plant you purchased was under typical lack of adequate care type of stress. It could very well be in shock. Bringing it home, changing its environment, could have added to it. What I do when this happens is cover the container for a few days; give it less light; make sure their environment stays stable; and wait for new growth to appear. Once that happens, the plant can be slowly acclimated towards its intended growing conditions. Generally speaking, D. spatulata does not require dormancy.

    My spatulata produce flowers and seeds like crazy. They also "clump", which means that they produce plantlets. I bought a clump of it last August and after a couple months I started separating plants from its perimeter and placed them into other pots. Before too long I had 6 pots and the original clump was no smaller in girth.

    Don't give up on this one - even if it doesn't make it.

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    I agree that it is like ly a light issue. Incidently, the correct name is Fraser Island.

    Your seed will be ready when the pods turn brown. Check my article on harvesting seed in the Article Forum for more details.

    Note that if your plant has been in the low light conditions that you mention it wil need to be introduced to full sun gradually by increasing the exposure daily for longer and longer periods or there will be a danger of sunburn.

    If your rosettes wither and turn brown, keep the pot a little less wet. Light will not be an issue if it is not in growth so I move mine to a less optimal spot under my lights. In time you may get new growth. Many of the Australian and South African species perform like this. It is a stress reaction designed to minimize impact from unfavorable harsh conditions in habitat. With patience and care many "dead" plants can often return.

    If the worst happens, PM me and I can send you seed of this variety. VEry likely seedlings will adjust to your conditions better than a purchased plant.
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    divaskid's Avatar
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    Thank you guys for the help. I will try my best and see what happens. I feel like itll pull through now. And thank you Tamlin for the seed offer, that makes me feel better to know I won't be at a total loss if everything heads for the worse.

    Some good news this morning though...I went out to check on my plants and my first sundew that had died, it now has a tiny little sundew coming up! So I'm totally happy I kept the dirt and waited just incase. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img]

    Thanks again!
    ~Michelle (AKA Geva or Jennifer)

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    The same thing proves true for the South African sub-tropical species, also for D. brevifolia, D. alelae, D. schizandra, D. binata, D. capillaris, D. oblanceolata....and the list goes on. Many times this sort of die back is part of the natural cycle of the species. Just set them aside and wait. Usually, you don't even have to hope!
    "Grow More, Share More"

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    True story: I received U. bisquamata seeds in March and sowed them. Several weeks went by and - nothing. In the meantime I received D. dielsiana seeds. I needed a container and I spread them out in the apparently barren bisquamata conatiner. A week later I saw sprouts. I thought, man that was quick. It normally takes a few weeks for my other Drosera seeds to germinate. Furthermore, they didn't look like Drosera seedlings. Bisquamata? Nah, couldn't be. It was. A few weeks later the REAL dielsiana sprouted. Now I had a situation!

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