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Thread: Gemmae

  1. #1
    chloroplast's Avatar
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    Hello all,

    I just received some gemmae and I went to the archives to find some answers on growing them.

    I'm still wondering: should I keep the pot in standing water, and how long does it take for them to become plantlets? Thanks, [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]
    Secretary, New England Carnivorous Plant Society (NECPS) http://www.necps.org/
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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    No doubt you received some (40+?) D. scorpiodes gemmae from BCK. So did I, 9 months ago. I then pelted him with a barrage of questions.

    This is what I did: I placed them in a formerly occupied pipette tip dispenser, with its inner container inverted, allowing for 100+ holes to be faced down. I then mixed a combination of (washed) and & peat (mostly sand). I placed the gemmae on top and closed the hunged lid. For an example of what the container looks like, just click on my profile. To the left of the D. capensis is a purple dispenser container. I put them on a window sill and let them have at it. Within days the gemmae visibly sprouted. They looked like miniature green fists, with the fingers pointing upward. Gradually, I went from having them totally covered to opening during the day to totally keeping the lid open. Basically, the container is a glorified terrarium (with the lid closed). I didn't have them in standing water, but they were certainly kept moist by being covered (at first). After removal, I just made sure that they were kept "open tray". That would be the equivalent of your "standing water".

    This method worked very well for me. All gemmae sprouted and none died, now 9 months later. I am sure others have modified success stories, so it isn't necessary to duplicate what I did. I work in a lab and those containers are a throwaway.

    With gpigmy sundews, it is more important to allow for deep, more than wide. They have developed root systems that endure harsh, dry conditions in their native Australia and have adapted by forming stipules, summer dormancy, and long tap roots.

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    http://www.cpzine.com/article.aspx?cid=13&y=2002&m=10&d=12
    "Grow More, Share More"

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    chloroplast's Avatar
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    Thanks once again, guys. I appreciate it.

    PS: Jimscott, that's certainly a unique use for a micropipette tip dispenser!
    Secretary, New England Carnivorous Plant Society (NECPS) http://www.necps.org/
    Member, International Carnivorous Plant Society (ICPS)
    Member, North American Sarracenia Conservancy (NASC)
    Member, The Carnivorous Plant Society (CPS)

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    You should see what I did with bungy cords, a shoe lace, and a toilet....

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    chloroplast's Avatar
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    I don't dare ask! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_m_32.gif[/img]

    Perhaps you should change your profile name to "MacGuyver"!
    Secretary, New England Carnivorous Plant Society (NECPS) http://www.necps.org/
    Member, International Carnivorous Plant Society (ICPS)
    Member, North American Sarracenia Conservancy (NASC)
    Member, The Carnivorous Plant Society (CPS)

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    Surprisingly, Allen Lowrie recommends 60/40 peaterlite for pygmies.

    Cheers,

    Joe

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