User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 8 of 10

Thread: D. anglica hi x ca

  1. #1
    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Alexandria Bay, NY Z-5a
    Posts
    6,341
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hey folks, I had a discusion with William on this way back and had noted that indeed, my D. anglica cross has formed a hairy shiny hibernacula, sort of like Pygmy Drosera get, those silverish shiny hair bunches in the growth point. My question is should I let it go dormant or what? Greenhouse is heated at 50F at night and up to 75-80F in the day depending on the presence of sun.

  2. #2
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Western New York
    Posts
    18,768
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Good question! I have one as well. Got it as a cutting from BigCarnivourKid. Ya may want to contact him.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Oswego, New York, U.S.A.
    Posts
    5,290
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    It is bound to happen in some of the individuals. I believe Ivan Snider culls the temperate forms, keeping only the non-dormant individuals.

    The seed from circulating as "Sp. Cuba" likewise behaved in the same manner, at least in my collection, despite it's coming from a certain "serious" grower, so I doubt that either form is a truly "tropical" species. In my collection only the material coming from Brazil forms no hibernacula.
    "Grow More, Share More"

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lincoln, NE
    Posts
    2,974
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Actually, that makes some sense. I bet D. intermedia started north and made it's way down South. Cuba, being close to the US, may still produces individuals that will eventually die in the wild, as they want to go dormant.
    The red filiformis is probably going thru a similar transformation.
    Of course, I may just be spouting Darwinian nonsense.

    Cheers,

    Joe

  5. #5
    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Alexandria Bay, NY Z-5a
    Posts
    6,341
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    So..let it go dormant?

  6. #6

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    California
    Posts
    620
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yes. Let it go dormant. You will be rewarded with a much bigger, more robust plant next year. I believe your temps may be a bit too warm for proper dormancy though. I grew a few hundred of these guys and discovered they all died out in the greenhouse but came back with great vigor from dormancy outdoors. I live in the San Jose, Caifornia area so our winters here are very cool - 38-45 F nights, 50-60F days.

    BTW...If you try to force the plant to continue growing after it has formed stipules (silvery hairs) and a hibernaculum, it may die out on you. Let nature take its course.

    Phil

  7. #7
    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Alexandria Bay, NY Z-5a
    Posts
    6,341
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    How hardy is it Phil? I live in northern New York (just about same climate as Tamlin, minus the snow) and we can get temperatures down to -30F quite frequently. Shall i move it to where I let the Sarracenia sleep (on the floor by a crack in the wall purposely to kepe the pots very very cold)?

    Thank you!

  8. #8

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    California
    Posts
    620
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I believe those temps are too extreme. If you are able to keep the plants above freezing, say in the 36-40F range you should do just fine. As temperates they can certainly take light frost, but I still would steer clear of this. Plants in situ are usually more extreme tolerant than plants in cultivation but many times they have thick layers of sphagnum protecting the main root stock.
    If you are able to keep Sarracenia in happy dormancy you will do fine with Dr. anglica. They do require natual light during this dormancy though or at least supplemental. I am a native of Rochester, NY myself so am very familiar with your winters. I used to keep my pots of temperates in a styrofoam cooler in an unheated basement under flourescent shop lights for 8 hours per day. I was able to grow many species year after year this way. Now all I do is leave them outside since we're somewhat mild here.

    I prefer the forms that go into dormancy because they store so much energy up for the next season and they have always come back so much bigger. I don't own a digita camera but some of my anglica HIxCA were over 3 inches across. They looked like intermedia on steroids It looks like they're going to divide themselves this winter. The crowns are seeming to split into multiple heads. I'll separate them when they begin active growth next year and just keep repeating the cycle. They're very worth the extra effort and I think worth keeping alive just as well.
    Good luck.

    Phil

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •