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Thread: Binata cutting

  1. #1

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    Question

    Hello everyone!

    I would like to start some Binata cuttings, but what would be the best way to achieve this? To follow the instructions here :
    http://epm-britt.ucdavis.edu/Savages/LeafCuttings.htm
    ?
    Which say basically to lay the leaves on sphagnum and covering them partially with more sphagnum?

    Or maybe have them grow in a pot of water?

    Thanks!
    If the dragon is bigger than his treasure, it's not worth the effort.

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    Capslock's Avatar
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    Either way works. I've had great success just cutting a 2-inch section of leaf, and laying it on some peat/sand. I put a pinch of peat over the ends, and that's it. After a while little plants start springing up from it. In my experience, it's an easy one to make cuttings from.

    Capslock
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  3. #3
    BobZ's Avatar
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    If you are primarily interested in cloning binata, I have found root cuttings regenerate very easily. Simply chop the fleshy binata root into 1-inch segments and put them on sphagnum or peat, lightly cover them, and shortly you will have lots of plants.

    Root segments work well with D. regia also.

  4. #4
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    The partially covering method worked very well for me when I tried that with D. filiformis.

  5. #5

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    It works great for D.spatulata...
    [img]http://home.**********.com/users/pondboy/Neps/Neps%20sig..JPG[/img]

  6. #6

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    So the sphagnum/peat method it is. Thanks guys!
    If the dragon is bigger than his treasure, it's not worth the effort.

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  7. #7
    Capslock's Avatar
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    Hey, frankly I'd listen to BobZ. He has more experience than any of us, though I think both methods work, as well as the glass of water method. When it comes down to it, most drosera are pretty easy to propagate.

    Capslock
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    My photos are copyright-free and public domain

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    Its works perfectly in RO water too, just enclose the leaf cuttings in a transparent pot (Masson type are perfect) close the lid, place it under light and wait. Most fungal attack are decreased this way, and it's a pretty lazy technique

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