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Thread: D.biflora

  1. #1
    Metal King
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    Hey folks,
    I got a tiny D.biflora plant a month or so ago and I don't know what it is trying to prove....
    I have it near some D.collinsae and D.madagascarensis that are doing really well...
    The D.biflora is kinda looking like its making hibernaculae or something, but its definitely going downhill...
    What's the deal?? Yesterday I moved it to my windowsill in desperation (I have a colony of D.tokaiensis there doing well albeit less colourful than the ones under lights).
    Any specific thing that this Drosera needs different than others

    (PS- I'm pretty sure I have the capitalization wrong on the species, please correct me- I imagine it's a D.rotundifolia subtype and thus capital "B" )
    Da Growlist

    "You don't need a license to drive a sandwich"-Spongebob Squarepants

  2. #2

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    Is this a temperate species?
    Carnivorous plants growlist:http://www.**********.com/cgi-bin....t=17597
    Onda je sultan pao mrtav do kostura

  3. #3
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    I did a search and came up with this link for a brief description of care and photos.

    http://www.geocities.com/sundewmatt/southamerican.html

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    I guess I should reply, considering I was the one who introduced this species into cultivation!

    ***IF*** you have the correct plant, then it should look like D.capillaris/ esmeraldae, since it's very simialr to both.

    I collected this species in the N state or Roraima, Brazil, growing in sandy soil in a savanna area. Being a typical savanna habitat, the area dries up completely for a few montsh of the year. Considering the size of the plants I saw (tiniest buggers!) I would say it grows as an annual in the wild.

    BUT... this does not mean it can't grow as a perennial in cultivation, which is what I believe it does do. Please ask Sundew Matt since he has been growing them for several years now.

    Good Luck!
    Fernando Rivadavia

  5. #5

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    Hi madubon,

    Highland conditions would probably be best. Maybe keep the plants cooler during the day with high humidity.

  6. #6
    Metal King
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    CP2K- Hello to you!! I have already moved it to a place with 15-16 C highs, that's about all I could think of...
    Fernando- the plant hasn't been much to look at yet, it was tiny when I got it and is still tiny, and doesn't currently have any leaves, but from what I saw it is the correct plant...
    Starman- Nope, apparently not...
    jimscott- thanks for your help- I had imagined that there would likely be tons of different "right way"s and I guess I was right

    Thank you all for the help, when I get around to posting my growlist you will see if it helped any [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]
    Da Growlist

    "You don't need a license to drive a sandwich"-Spongebob Squarepants

  7. #7

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    NO, NO, NO!!! Definitely NOT highland!!! D.biflora is one of the rare LOWLAND species in S.America.

    It was growing at ~200m altitude or less in a really hot, steamy region just N of the Amazon, located at the base of the Gran Sabana plateau, which is ~1000-1400m, from which rise the famous tepuis. Really, it was one of the hottest places I've ever been!!

    Take Care,
    Fernando

  8. #8

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    Sorry, my mistake. All of the brazilian sp. I have grown, grew well in highland conditions. I guess this is different though.
    What are the other lowland species?

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