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Thread: Byblis propagation

  1. #1
    N=R* fs fp ne fl fi fc L Pyro's Avatar
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    So I got to thinking, after reading Barry's article in the CPN, are there any other lost propogatin techniques out there. So I was reading Slack's second book and saw that he says that Byblis gigantea can be propogated via stem cuttings. He claims that there is an almost 100% success rate with this method!! So my question is, has anyone ever tried this?? Because it seems to me that it would sure beat having to grow this beast from seed if someone could just clone a whole bunch for trade.
    'My love was science- specifically biology and, more specifically, when placed in a common jar, which of two organisms would devour the other.'

    See You Space Cowboy

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  2. #2

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    Sounds like another good CPN article in the making, to me.

    Cheers,

    Joe

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    Its in The Pietropaleo's book Carnivorous Plants of the World. IT tells how to do it.

  4. #4
    N=R* fs fp ne fl fi fc L Pyro's Avatar
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    Slack's book also tells how to do it, a couple three paragraphs if I am remembering right.
    'My love was science- specifically biology and, more specifically, when placed in a common jar, which of two organisms would devour the other.'

    See You Space Cowboy

    actagggcagtgatatcccattggtacatggcaaattagcctcatgat
    Hagerstown, Maryland

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    actagggcagtgatatcccattggtacatggcaaattagcctcatgat

  5. #5

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    So, do we not turn to our old favorites enough and rely on "Savage Garden, instead?"

    Cheers,

    Joe

  6. #6
    N=R* fs fp ne fl fi fc L Pyro's Avatar
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    I personally think a lot of good books have taken the back seat to SG. Not necessarily because SG is better just that it is 1) still in print 2) is so well known and 3) is on Barry's site which is probably what most newbies find first.

    Slack seems to have taken on the status of a myth to most of the new generation of CPers, as have many of the old hands at this. I still remember the first book on CPs that I read and I do not think I have once heard it brought up by anyone in the community but in its day it was extrememly good.

    I would personally advocate that everyone who claims to be a CPer needs to go out and read all the CP books they can find (try libraries) because there are some that cover information that SG never even touches on.
    'My love was science- specifically biology and, more specifically, when placed in a common jar, which of two organisms would devour the other.'

    See You Space Cowboy

    actagggcagtgatatcccattggtacatggcaaattagcctcatgat
    Hagerstown, Maryland

    --
    actagggcagtgatatcccattggtacatggcaaattagcctcatgat

  7. #7
    Capslock's Avatar
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    Not only that, Pyro, but everyone who claims to be a CPer should be experimenting from time to time, and not just relying on ANY book. Everyone's experiences are different (for example, I've never been able to propagate ANYTHING in a glass of water.) The people who wrote those books are just like the rest of us, and write based on their experiences and accumulated knowledge. I love my Savage Garden book, but know that it just reflects the experiences and knowledge of D'Amato. He'd be the first one to tell you that there are other ways and methodsand facts, and that there are mistakes in the book. What I like is how user-friendly it is, and how it seems to generate enthusiasm for the hobby. It's more of a hobbyists book than a scientific tome.

    Anyway, who's going to try the stem-cutting with Byblis

    Capslock
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    My photos are copyright-free and public domain

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    I nominate ......somebody who has one. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_l_32.gif[/img]

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