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Thread: Found! Drosera auriculata!

  1. #9

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    D. auriculata grows like a weed. In some areas close to my home it virtually is a weed.

    As Christian said, do not place the seeds in the fridge. They are not a temperate species and do not need stratification.

    I have many of them growing in other pots just as the weedy D. capensis and D. spatulata do. The pots are always wet and the D. auriculatas grow and go dormant as they please.

    The only issue with a species such as this is that it is very difficult to grow under lights as it can grow quite tall. All mine are grown in my greenhouse.

    Definitely give it a go.




  2. #10

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    Despite being a tuberous Drosera, this one doesn't behave like one, especially when trying to germinate it (no summer heat needed). Easy peasy plants if you ask me (and others by the looks of things!).

  3. #11

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    Not all tuberous Drosera are difficult to germinate or require Summer heat- including some of the WA species.

    D. auriculata is incredibly easy to grow but it still behaves just as any other tuberous species does. It is just a little more tolerant of different conditions than many of the other species. It is an eastern Australian plant and grows in generally more forgiving situations than many of the WA environments.

  4. #12

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    Tre,

    I am curious about your cold stratifying D. auriculata. Did that result in normal germination for you?

    Cheers,

    Joe

  5. #13
    ChronoKiento's Avatar
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    Wow, you guys really reassured me that I could do this. *ahem* concidering that my avatar thinger says "failure" anyway I think I'm going to try. Can I just stick the seeds in the soil then put them outside for the summer heat to do it's job? Everywhere I've read says I need gibberalic acid or heat stratification. I'm glad to hear that it's not requred and I'm also glad to hear that dormancy is not required. I know I need a deep pot, no problem. Soil mixture, check. I know they like it sort of cool, so can I grow it as a windowsil plant?...like..will they germinate on a bright windowsill??
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    To say they don't need a dormancy is not correct. D. auriculata will go dormant. If you will be growing the plant on a windowsill where the photoperiod will vary throughout the year (as opposed to the controlled lighting of a lighted tank) your plants will go dormant in Summer and grow during Winter.

    For the seeds to germinate Summer heat is not required and certainly not beneficial. The seeds like cool conditions to germinate well, so just place them somewhere cool and they should do fine. When they are growing don't let them get too hot or they'll go dormant early.

    To be honest if you get the seeds this time of year you are probably about 6 months from the best time of yewar to sow. The ideal time is at the end of Summer when the nights are beginning to get cooler. This way you get a full growing season out of them. The will germinate and grow now just not as well as they would through Winter.

  7. #15
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Do not use "soil"! If you use "soil" instead of soilless media, you will most likely cause yourself many more difficulties than you may wish to experience. Soil's contain many problematic organisms that can complicate things quite a bit.



    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

  8. #16
    ChronoKiento's Avatar
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    By soil, I mean peat and sand mixed... So..what if I germinated them in my cool terrarium and then kept them going until next summer...and then make them go dormant. Would that work? I would hold off until the fall to get them if I were sure that they'd still be available then. But I'm almost positive that they won't be available then....speaking of "soil" I need to get some more peat moss and sand. Sand is so hard to find. My mom found this huge bag of silica sand that's used for fish tank filters. Would that work? Everyone says "silica sand! use silica sand!" but it's hard to tell if I've got the right stuff.

    EDIT- I have this 1 liter plastic pot that has 3:1 sandeat but I used it to try to germinate byblis plants. If I washed the peat and sand in it, would I be able to use that since I ran out of sand? Also, would perlite work if washing the peat and sand won't work? And to top that all off with another question, the sand I use is sort of large grained because it's really just ornamental sand. But I don't see why it wouldn't work except for the fact that same grains are almost a millimeter in width. There are small grains as well but I'm just being really cautious. It's rare that I order anything on the internet and I really don't want it to be a waste. Thanks for all the help that you guys are giving me.
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