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Thread: Dried blood worms

  1. #1

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    I've read on the forums that some of you use dried bloodworms as food for your Drosera. I was under the impression that many of the Drosera species that use movement such as D. capensis are stimulted to move by the movement of the struggling insect which inturn stimulates digestion. With a food such as bloodworms, there is no movement, so how is digestion stimulated? I guess I'm just questioning the nutritional bennifit to the plant if digestion is not stimulated by a struggling insect.

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    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Not, "dried bloodworms", but freeze-dried bloodworms, a difference that is perhaps, subtle, but I do not believe "dried bloodworms" are available, unless you buy the frozen ones and then dry them yourself.

    Try sprinkling a little on a Drosera leaf and you can answer that question for yourself.

    A hypothesis is only an assumption (an educated guess) unless you follow it with experimentation and observation. It will either support your hypothesis or eliminate it as a valid possibility.
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    The freeze-dried bloodworms work well with butterworts. Cindy, the Moderator, has some pics of her Mexican Pings, with a heart-shaped pattern or FD - BW's

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    I have been giving occasional feedings of freeze-dried bloodworms to several of my Drosera species, D. capensis among them, and I have found that they respond to the bloodworms almost as fast as to live, moving prey.

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    Greetings,

    Perhaps it's the presence of certain nutrients that stimulate enzyme production in Drosera. The leaves of my sundew curl up and secrete fluids in response to dead insects.

    Brian

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    apple rings.. what more can i say? FlytrapGurl's Avatar
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    Pingman, I think Jason means the dried ones you can buy for fish food.
    Liquid Plummer
    Warning: Do not reuse the bottle to store beverages.

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    Greetings,

    I did an experiment. I took some dried bloodworms and powdered them. I spinkled a very small amount on a couple D. capensis leaves. Within ten minutes both leaves curled up, just as they would with a live insect. In one hour, the leaves were dripping with digestive juices. The response to the dried bloodworms was greater than a live insect.

    It seems that the digestion process has very little to do with the struggle of an insect, and a lot to do with the leaves ability to detect the presence of certain nutrients.

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Here's the picture of Cindy's butterwort and bloodworms:


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