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Thread: Drosera paradoxa, fulva, spatulata, intermedia

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    chloroplast's Avatar
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    Hello all,

    Several of my Drosera species are flowering: D. paradoxa, fulva, spatulata, and intermedia 'cuba.' The paradoxa and fulva flowers haven't bloomed yet, the spatulata is blooming, and the intermedia has finished blooming.

    My question is whether any of these will self-pollinate to produce seed. If so, how long should I keep the stalk attached to the plant before cutting it and collecting the seed?

    Also, once I collect the seed, can I sow them immediately or must I wait (and if I have to wait, for how long and how do I store them)?

    If I'm unlucky enough to hear that none produce viable seed, then I guess I'll just cut off the stalks once the flowers have died. Last year, I was worried about keeping the darned things alive, so I fell much better now that flowering/seed is all I have to worry about!

    Thanks for your time.

    Best regards,

    chloroplast
    Secretary, New England Carnivorous Plant Society (NECPS) http://www.necps.org/
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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Ijust posted a topic about D. paradoxa, as mine are sending up stalks. Apparently, they are not self-pollinating, so you need flower from another plants. D. intermedia & spatulata are self-pollinating. D. spatulata perpetuates itself without any help. I don't know about startification for D. intermedia 'Cuba', but my D. sp. cuba 1 drops seed in the pot an ne plants are produced without any help from me.

    I haven't a clue about D. fulva, but would sure love to trade seeds with you!

    When the flower posds turn dark, it is time to collect them.

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    chloroplast's Avatar
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    Hi Jimscott,

    Thanks for the reply; it's nice talking to you again. You probably forget, but when I joined this forum last year (and the world of CPs), you were one of several people in this forum who truely went out of their way to answer the many questions I had. Well, a year has gone by and my collection has grown (and I'm happy to report few "mortalities" have occured since). Hope all is going well with you and your plants.

    Yes, I read your topic on D.paradoxa seed--too bad this beautiful plant won't self-pollinate as I only have one.

    Regarding the intermedia and spatulata, I'll do as you suggest and wait until the pods darken. Should I sow them immediately, or wait?

    In terms of the fulva, regardless of whether I get seed, the flowering will be enough for me this time around (it's the first time this plant has sent up a flower stalk....so I'm in great anticipation). If it does produce seed, I promise to send you a few "on the house."!

    Well, thanks again for the reply. Good luck with your plants.
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (chloroplast @ May 22 2005,7:18)]Several of my Drosera species are flowering: D. paradoxa, fulva, spatulata, and intermedia 'cuba.' The paradoxa and fulva flowers haven't bloomed yet, the spatulata is blooming, and the intermedia has finished blooming.
    They should all self seed except those in the petiolaris complex - paradoxa & fulva. My understanding is that for those to produce seed, you need two separate clones.

    That's one of the challenges with this complex - to get seed you need different clones that happen to flower simultaneously.

    Good luck w/ them.
    All the best,
    Ron
    You must do the thing you think you cannot do. --- Eleanor Roosevelt

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (chloroplast @ May 22 2005,10:52)]Hi Jimscott,

    Thanks for the reply; it's nice talking to you again. You probably forget, but when I joined this forum last year (and the world of CPs), you were one of several people in this forum who truely went out of their way to answer the many questions I had. Well, a year has gone by and my collection has grown (and I'm happy to report few "mortalities" have occured since). Hope all is going well with you and your plants.

    Yes, I read your topic on D.paradoxa seed--too bad this beautiful plant won't self-pollinate as I only have one.

    Regarding the intermedia and spatulata, I'll do as you suggest and wait until the pods darken. Should I sow them immediately, or wait?

    In terms of the fulva, regardless of whether I get seed, the flowering will be enough for me this time around (it's the first time this plant has sent up a flower stalk....so I'm in great anticipation). If it does produce seed, I promise to send you a few "on the house."!

    Well, thanks again for the reply. Good luck with your plants.
    Thanks, that brightens my day! With regard to the D. intermedia & spatulata seeds, I really don't know. The spatulata dropped seeds last summer when I had them outside. So my 'guess' is that they can be sown right away.
    With D. intermedia, I have never had seeds - just a related cultivar (D. sp. Cuba1) and where I hadn't been diligent to save seed pods out, they have sown themselves. Hopefully, more advice will follow.

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    Well, I usually wait for a period of time before sowing them - this is only due to time constraints though. However I remember sowing a batch of seed I had collected no less than 5 seconds before and
    not one
    of them sprouted. Not ONE! Too young perhaps? [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/confused.gif[/img] I had always thought the fresher the better.

    Anyway, that's only one time, so I do not know whether it was caused by the age of the seed or some other external factor. If you only have one batch of seed to sow then don't try too early...my result may be an anomalie but then I'm not too sure...

    Jason

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    Jimscott: No problem--I like to give credit when credit is due!
    Sounds like your 'cuba' is very fertile.....I wish my drosera self-sowed.

    RL7836 & Jason: Thanks for the replies. Seems like the only two I should expect seed from are the intermedia and spatulata and, to play it safe, I should probably wait a bit before sowing. I don't think viability will drop significantly if I wait a week or two.
    Secretary, New England Carnivorous Plant Society (NECPS) http://www.necps.org/
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Jimscott: No problem--I like to give credit when credit is due!
    Sounds like your 'cuba' is very fertile.....I wish my drosera self-sowed.
    Lol, if your dosera self sowed, you wouldn't wish it, I assure you. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_m_32.gif[/img]

    Cuba is always fertile. It is the about the only species which throws its seeds all around the place here without needing coaxing (besides D. burmmanii and D.spatulata that is) [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img] Not to mention accidental plantlets when its leaves get in contact with wet soil.

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