User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 17 to 24 of 25

Thread: Petiolaris complex

  1. #17
    RL7836's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    New Jersey, USA
    Posts
    3,252
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]I am thinking these guys are really teeny tiny.
    They're not like pygmies if that's what you mean. This plant is about 1.75 inches in diameter.
    All the best,
    Ron
    You must do the thing you think you cannot do. --- Eleanor Roosevelt

    *** Growlist / Wants / Offers ***
    (with Pics)

  2. #18
    RL7836's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    New Jersey, USA
    Posts
    3,252
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (homer @ June 17 2005,5:55)]My Petiolaris Complex Drosera are growing in a 10 gallon fish tank. There's about 4 inches of water in the bottom with a 200w fish tank heater set to maximum temperature ~90F. The plants are placed on grid that's supported by upside down pots in order for them to be above the water. I use the tray method. Glass covers the top except for about 1/4" on each side, so some airflow is achieved. The heater goes off with the lights every night. Temperatures range from 85-90 during the day, and around 70 at night. As for RH, it hovers in the 80% range. I'll post a picture later this evening (I hope).

    -Homer
    Homer,
    This seems like a big change from your setup of a few months ago. What prompted the change?

    Keep a close eye on the growth of your more pubescent (hairy) species vs the others in these conditions. I've had very similar conditions for the past several months and my D. lanata's growth has slowed tremendously after an initial growth spurt and my D. ordensis has either re-entered dormancy or croaked*. I want to do some more checking but I'm wondering if the woolier species may prefer a lower humidity environment than the glabrous species. (this has been the experience of one other grower I contacted).

    I'm going to test this theory w/ a 'drier' setup sometime in the near future. I'll let you know how it goes...


    * - there was also an 'event' where I lost my more powerful lighting and the plants had to endure lower light levels for a period (see the red & green leaves on the D. kenneallyi). [Later edit - the D. ordensis definitely died [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_h_32.gif[/img] )
    All the best,
    Ron
    You must do the thing you think you cannot do. --- Eleanor Roosevelt

    *** Growlist / Wants / Offers ***
    (with Pics)

  3. #19
    homer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Puyallup, Washington USA
    Posts
    679
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Homer,
    This seems like a big change from your setup of a few months ago. What prompted the change?
    Ahh, last year sometime I had this same setup, but I used an incandescent light [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_t_32.gif[/img] to "heat" or "fry"... whichever term you wanna use. Needless to say this one was one of my best blunders and I killed the paradoxa I had within hours. BUT I did manage to save a few leaves and I got 1 successful leaf cutting, and now the paradoxa is mature again. Dodged a bullet there. Anyway, this time around I'm using fluorescent lighting. I always wanted to go back to this setup, its not "new", its just my 2nd attempt.

    Thanks for the information regarding the more hairy woolies. I'll keep my eyes on them. My ordensis just came out of dormancy, and is hanging out, but still growing. My seedlings are in this tank as well, so I need to keep it humid. I might make try to make a dry season of some kind in the future to give them a break.

    [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]

    -Homer

  4. #20

    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Southern CA, US
    Posts
    1,058
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Just bringing this post back up...

    Hi Ron,

    I think you have a point there with the low humidity. Some of my healthiest petiolaris Drosera plants are grown under low humidity. I've been growing Drosera paradoxa from seed to flowering plants within 6 months in an outdoor terrarium that is 75% covered(traps the heat but not much of the humidity). It seems like the perfect place for cactus, rather than Drosera.
    Otherwise, I have an indoor setup consisting of a large plastic container covered partly with some saran wrap(again to trap heat rather than humidity). The container sits on a heat mat(used on winter nights, but not in the summer) and the plants do not sit permanently in water as I allow the tray to dry out for a couple days between watering. When I use bottom heat, I take off most of the covering. There is no condensation in the container, even at night. Plants are grown within inches of 4 40watt flourescent tubes-cool white.
    Here is a hairy form of D.paradoxa from 100km north of Drysdale River Station grown outdoors year-round. This plant will go into a semi-dormant state during the winter(smalller leaves), but still grows.
    [img]http://home.**********.com/users/cp2k/photo%20090.jpg[/img]
    Drosera kenneallyi "type form"-Theda Station, Kimberley, WA
    This particular clone produces traps that are naturally folded, even without prey, however, I did recently feed the plant in the photo. I have another clone from the same location growing in the same terrarium that produces the normal nonfolded traps. This was grown indoors in the above mentioned setup:
    [img]http://home.**********.com/users/cp2k/photo%20098.jpg[/img]
    Drosera aff.ordensis "narrow leaf form"-Theda Station, Kimberley. This was indoor grown in the above mentioned setup:
    [img]http://home.**********.com/users/cp2k/photo%20096.jpg[/img]
    Trap detail, recently fed:
    [img]http://home.**********.com/users/cp2k/photo%20106.jpg[/img]
    Drosera lanata "type"- Lotus Glen, Mareeba, N.Queensland. Grown indoors in the above mentioned setup:
    [img]http://home.**********.com/users/cp2k/photo%20100.jpg[/img]
    Drosera paradoxa "pink flower"-Mt.Bomford, Kimberley, WA. These were grown under ~80% humidity in a tray with the 2in humidity dome separate from my other petiolaris dews. Somehow a moth got inside...
    [img]http://home.**********.com/users/cp2k/photo%20066.jpg[/img]
    I've also noticed that the traps of Drosera petiolaris move faster than most other Drosera species(besides maybe burmannii etc.), especially on a hot afternoon.

  5. #21

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Oswego, New York, U.S.A.
    Posts
    5,290
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've grown most members of the complex and have a few thoughts to share. I agree with most of what has been said but offer a word of caution regarding repotting. There is an urge when plant is doing well to repot into larger containers. In my experience this is not always wise, and especially so for the petiolaris plants. Rapid growth and offsetting in my collection often happened prior to the plants heading into dormancy. The moisture content in the pot needs to be reduced in increments *as soon as signs of dormancy are noticed*, so that the pots are just moist by the time new growth ceases. I found plants growing lustily one month quickly shut down growth. Too much moisture in the pot and you get crown rot and plant loss. The larger pots take longer to dry off, and the time difference can spell success or failure. I would suggest a largely inorganic medium that can be quickly dried out, and close attention to signs of incipient dormancy, and recommend that the plants be kept in smaller pots for this reason. I haven't run any controlled experiments, its just a gut level feeling. I also haven't been able to determine any rhyme or reason to the dormancy triggers: some plants shut down in winter, some in summer. I believe that uniform warmth with little differential between day and night temps. *may* contribute to forestalling dormancy, but it isn't an absolute. I have watched large offsetting plants take a nose dive within a month, so there is little forgiveness. I also recommend plants not sit in tray water, but be given water only when the need is apparent. For me, the plants did respond to higher than normal levels of humidity, and were grown outdoors in terraria with covers open a few inches while avoiding night time drops by applying bottom heat as necessary. It meant a lot of fussing in my area since the differential is 5-10 degrees even in summer.
    "Grow More, Share More"

  6. #22
    RL7836's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    New Jersey, USA
    Posts
    3,252
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi CP2K,
    Nice plants & nice photos - thanks for sharing these and your info.

    In your post, you bring up an interesting point on heat:
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]....I've been growing Drosera paradoxa from seed to flowering plants within 6 months in an outdoor terrarium that is 75% covered(traps the heat but not much of the humidity). It seems like the perfect place for cactus, rather than Drosera.
    Otherwise, I have an indoor setup consisting of a large plastic container covered partly with some saran wrap(again to trap heat rather than humidity). The container sits on a heat mat....
    Obviously most of the longer-term growers of this group seem to find that higher heat is a good thing for Pet complex plants. My question - where is the upper limit? When I hear about terrariums outside in the LA sun, it really makes me wonder how high of temps these plants can handle. Have you ever stuck a temp probe / thermometer in there? Or better yet - a digital max-reading thermometer? I really don't want to find out the hard way what the upper limits are by finding 'mush' when I get home.

    We know that there is a limit as Pingman found with some D. falconeri cuttings/divisions (from a 2002 post):
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ].... There were many basal leaf segments that were knocked loose in this process and I placed the smaller crown and the loose pieces into wet, long-fiber NZ Sphagnum Moss in a small translucent plastic box with a lid of the same material. I kept the plastic box within 2 inches of a 100-watt incandescent light. Disaster, this time I had the light too close and when I checked the "propagation ward" everything inside looked mushy, brown, and dead. I almost cried. But I moved the container farther from the light and ....
    Based on my [limited] personal experience, I've measured 107-108*F (42*C) in my terrarium in the sun and the plants loved it (or so it seemed). I suspect that the max is much higher - what temps should start to cause nervousness? And is the high temp related to the humidity (plants can stand higher temps in higher humidity)?

    I think I've read a Seandew post that his greenhouse sees 45*C (113*F) temps in the summer with no issues (is that the temp the plants see?)

    Just since my original post on humidity - I've opened my top more and allowed the setup to dry out between waterings and the D. lanata has resumed its previous growth and none of the other plants have suffered (still early but looks promising)...
    All the best,
    Ron
    You must do the thing you think you cannot do. --- Eleanor Roosevelt

    *** Growlist / Wants / Offers ***
    (with Pics)

  7. #23

    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Southern CA, US
    Posts
    1,058
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi Ron,

    One of the reasons I never completely seal the terrarium is because the temperatures would be too high. I have tried growing paradoxa in a sealed terrarium outdoors in full sun. In the winter and spring, the plants grew fine, however, the plants died back during the summer. I did not record the temperature, but the pots were almost too hot to handle.

  8. #24
    RL7836's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    New Jersey, USA
    Posts
    3,252
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi Tamlin,
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]The moisture content in the pot needs to be reduced in increments *as soon as signs of dormancy are noticed*, so that the pots are just moist by the time new growth ceases. I found plants growing lustily one month quickly shut down growth. Too much moisture in the pot and you get crown rot and plant loss. The larger pots take longer to dry off, and the time difference can spell success or failure. I would suggest a largely inorganic medium that can be quickly dried out, ...
    Thanks for this info. In researching old postings, I've come across similar recommendations (seems that a lot of people lose plants during dormancy [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_h_32.gif[/img] ). One thing that has bothered me with these recomendations is how to do it...

    If I've got small pots with a mostly inorganic media, that I want to dry out failrly quickly - how do I keep them from drying out completely and killing the plant? Everyone seems to say to keep the pots slightly damp during dormancy. At 90*F+, things can dry out pretty quickly. Maybe it's just the years of growing all the other VFTs, Drosera & Sarrs that have me really paranoid. Many times, when they completely dry out, they're dead. Just a few weeks ago, I had to take a trip and be away for a few days. I tried to give detailed instructions to my family but when I got home, I noticed that a small group of D. rotundifolia that was growing larger than anything I've grown before - were dead (one has since resurrected).

    Are plants in the petiolaris complex naturally more resistant to being dried out - so they can handle it better than other plants I've grown? As I've noted previously, I've slowly been experimenting with lower humidities (with pretty extreme paranoia) and getting decent results so far.... [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/confused.gif[/img]
    All the best,
    Ron
    You must do the thing you think you cannot do. --- Eleanor Roosevelt

    *** Growlist / Wants / Offers ***
    (with Pics)

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •