User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 9 to 14 of 14

Thread: Heavy rain and your sundews

  1. #9

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    2,073
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    That's why I love my terrariums [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img] No rain!

  2. #10

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Oswego, New York, U.S.A.
    Posts
    5,290
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    First off, ditch the perlite and go with sand which doesn't float. All my Drosera were grown outdoors during the warmer months in undrained plastic containers (bins that fish came in). Some were actually aquatic for weeks on end with no ill effects noted when the water receeded. If strong rains were in the cards I would cover the bins with their lids, but otherwise they were exposed to whatever Mamma gave them.

    I have to disagree about the comment on terrarium culture: I never found a need for this with Drosera and plants so grown never did as well as those in more open scenarios although the Queensland species did need some babying to get them toughened up. 40% RH and above seems adequate for just about all of the species, and I have grown most of them.

    Strong Drosera are remarkably resiliant and spring right back after rains, even if the lamina are covered with peat. Rains also leach out salts from the pots and wash away prey corpses which are prone to fungus infections that can affect the plants. Noticing the growth spurt evident after rains, I speculate that the litter actualy provided some nutritional benefit to the plants. Best effects were reached with plants started from seed in the nekkid outdoors - these required no hardening off or babying at all. Switching from closed to open growing takes observational care and patience to get them hardened off.
    "Grow More, Share More"

  3. #11

    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Michigan Zone 5 (near Flint)
    Posts
    617
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I grow several drosera outdoors. We just got torrential downpours from the remnants of the huricane. They are all currently underwater. The level should receed in about three to four days. Thay all seem to love it.

    Glenn

  4. #12

    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    1,338
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Tamlin Dawnstar @ July 18 2005,3:19)]First off, ditch the perlite and go with sand which doesn't float.
    Huge bag of perlite for sale cheap... [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_n_32.gif[/img]
    There's a tunnel at the end of the light...

  5. #13

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Houston TX
    Posts
    975
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I no longer use perlite in my outdoor pots.

    Here are some tips:

    You can top-dress the peat/perlite or peat/sand mix with long-fiber sphagnum, or live sphagnum.

    Don't worry about the sphagnum burying the plants; just harvest it and use it in other pots.

    You can also sow the peat surface with a fast-growing utic (like U. subulata) that will help hold the surface together when it rains.

    In my outdoor pots, I put peat in the bottom half of the pot. The rest is filled with LFS.

    My Sarracenia love it.
    My Grow List

    "We are just an advanced breed of monkeys on a minor planet of a very average star. But we can understand the Universe. That makes us something very special." -- Stephen Hawking

  6. #14
    homer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Puyallup, Washington USA
    Posts
    679
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Huge bag of perlite for sale cheap... [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_n_32.gif[/img]
    Perlite is $3.99 a bag, even for small bags in my neck of the woods. I buy 100 lb bags of silica sand (used for sandblasting) for $8. That goes a loooong ways. I think its much easier to work with, when rinsing and all. Another alternative might be pumice. That shouldn't rise to the surface.

    Also, I leave my outdoor Drosera exposed year around to whatever nature brings their way. Can't beat the coloration and vibrance of Drosera growing outdoors.

    -Homer

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •