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Thread: They don't look like n. ampullaria

  1. #9

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    Hi Sborirak:

    I agree with Tony: that's how most small plantlets look when they are very young. You'll have to wait at least another year before you see the real characteristics of the plant.
    Mutations occur in nature and in TC, i guess, but not so many as to change the the overal characteristics of a particular plant.

    so please, be patient and good luck
    [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]

    Gus

  2. #10
    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
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    Ah, I guess I'm just judging the scale poorly then; to me it appears to be much larger than seedling size in the photo.
    ~Joe
    o//~ Livin' like a bug ain't easy / My old clothes don't seem to fit me /
    I got little tiny bug feet / I don't really know what bugs eat /
    Don't want no one steppin' on me / Now I'm sympathizin' with fleas /
    Livin' like a bug ain't easy / Livin' like a bug ain't easy... o//~

  3. #11
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    Joe, It may well not be all that small. TC produces some odd things because plants grow fast they can get to a good size but still display very juvenile characteristics.

    I find that plant age is very important for Nepenthes to show their typical characteristics. An older smaller plant grown in less ideal conditions will show more mature characteristics than a larger younger plant grown in much better conditions.

    Tony
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

  4. #12
    Moderator Cindy's Avatar
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    Pitchers without tendrils are very common for basal shoots that appear over time. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img] I see them all the time on a particular N.gracilis I own.
    Cindy

  5. #13

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    Thanks for all comments. Yes , I agree with Cindy. All Nep. grown by seeds in my experience develop pitchers without tendrils when they were small . I put more photos of Viking x veitchii babies and Red Tiger babies in the same old URL . (Sorry I don't know how to insert pics in this board)My Webpage

  6. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (seedjar @ Oct. 02 2005,5:40)]I've never seen any pitchers without tendrils before... Tony, do you mean to say that this is a typical occurance in young TC plants? I've seen leaves without pitchers or tendrils, and pitchers on tendrils without leaves, but never a leaf and pitcher with nothing in between. Very interesting.
    ~Joe
    Typical occurance alright, my young TC raff/hookeriana already has spots and the pitchers are still attached to the leves w/ out tendrils...

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