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Thread: It keeps getting better and better

  1. #33

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    What Rob often does, especially with some of the rarer stuff, is grows a bunch of them from seed, and puts some of the seed into tissue culture. The seed-grown plants, not being divided and divided in vitro, reach maturity earlier. The seed grown plants are the first to be sold and then later the tissue cultured plants are released. Seed-grown material is more highly sought after because each plant is a unique individual, whereas tissue cultured plants share their genes with thousands of other clones.

    So whenever you see a reference to different individuals from seed on his pricelist, it means they're from seed and not TC. If you seed 'selection from 42 clones' or something like that, it means they are from tissue culture.

    In relation to the jacquelineae x izumiae, my understanding is that the hybrid appeared amongst seed-grown plants. Occasionally a hybrid will appear in TC, but Sods Law mitigates against that. When Rob released a bunch of seed-grown lowii, some of them turned out to be Trusmadiensis. Of course, none of their siblings in TC turned out to be the hybrid, they were all pure lowii.
    Demystifying Nepenthes: http://www.nepenthesforeveryone.com

  2. #34

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    Er, I'll put my head over the parapet again
    The differences I thought I could see were the 'hybrid' having a subapical tendril insertion, shorter/fewer hairs at the edges of the leaves, a slightly less angular peristome and generally lighter coloring. All of these could well be within the natural variation of izumiae though, I don't know as I've never read the formal description of the species.
    But thanks to all for the imput (and I'll be in touch, Rob )
    Cheers,
    T.

  3. #35

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    Hamish,

    You're quite correct, that's exactly what we do. Only one thing though, we do seem to get a much higher proportion of hybrids appearing in TC than one would observe in the wild and I don't know why, unless they just don't survive well in natural habitat. The best example of this is with N. bicalcarata. Out of 24 clones we kept in TC we had a large proportion turn out to be unexpected forms and hybrids, some of which I've never seen in the wild. They were:

    N. bicalcarata, typical orange flush - about 6 clones
    N. bicalcarata, red flush - very rare in Brunei where the seed was collected from
    N. bicalcarata x gracilis - several clones
    N. bicalcarata 'red shorthorn' - a red form with stubby fangs - one clone
    N. bicalcarata x (gracilis x ampullaria) - several clones
    N. bicalcarata x ampullaria - one clone

    Rob Cantley
    Nep Nut in Sri Lanka
    http://www.borneoexotics.com

  4. #36
    rattler's Avatar
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    Rob with the more complex ones such as N. bicalcarata x (gracilis x ampullaria) is this just your best guess as to parentage because of what was growing in the area or what? just curious.
    cervid serial killer
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  5. #37

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    There's a lot of N. x trichocarpa around there and the appearance of the pitcher is exactly what you would expect from that cross. I had already made up my mind and then showed a plant to Ch'ien lee without comment to see what he said. He immediately made the same ID, so I'm pretty sure. I'l see if I can get a photo, it's a very pretty plant.
    Rob Cantley
    Nep Nut in Sri Lanka
    http://www.borneoexotics.com

  6. #38
    N=R* fs fp ne fl fi fc L Pyro's Avatar
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    Re: sex determination. It is not really genetic in plants, it is hormonal. Most of the research in this area is what the weed-heads have discovered but male plants can be "switched" to female plants by application of certain chemicals at certain times. Now, yes the hormones are genetically controlled but it is not a predetermined thing in plants, there are not "sex chromosomes" like in animals. Regulation of the genes is environmentally regulated at an early age. A slight stress environment favors males which produce copious amounts of pollen (vs. seed) thereby encouraging the availability of greater genetic variation within the geen pool thereby promoting various genotypes, one of which should hopefully be more likely to survive the stressful environment.
    'My love was science- specifically biology and, more specifically, when placed in a common jar, which of two organisms would devour the other.'

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  7. #39

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    Very interesting Pyro. Charles Clarke has a section in the Sumatra book dealing with gender in Nepenthes populations. A general conclusion reveals males growing out in exposed, harsh areas. I believe they found 100 percent of rafflesiana growing in open harsh environments were male, whereas females were found growing in more sheltered environments, under shrubs and trees.

  8. #40

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    Hi Pyro:

    Very interesting information. If we analyze it, it'd be very curious to find out why under the same growing environment a plant has two sexes. Unfortunately for the people who grow these plants in captivity, the sex of the plant does not change but remain the same. A male is always a male and a female is always a female.
    Therefore it should be a predisposition of the plant to keep a particular sex, whether it's given by sex hormones or X hormones nobody may know the genes encoding for the predisposition to have a male character or female character may still be constant.
    Whether you can play with the expression of the genes and change the gender is a different story.
    Now, going back to the original discussion if these sex hormone genes are mixed in any particular cross between two different species, we should get a very homogeneous distributions of these.

    Gus

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