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Thread: Upper & lower pitchers

  1. #9
    chloroplast's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]A: No. A cutting will produce whatever it produces. So you'll get lower pitchers from a portion of vine producing lowers, and either lower or upper pitchers from a portion of vine producing uppers.
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]A: As can be infered from the above, flowers would only really be produced from upper cuttings
    Wow! I certainly learn many new things everyday I visit these forums!

    For instance, I was under the assumption that the production of lower versus upper pitchers was somehow determined by the environment and not by the genetic potential of the plant. That is, I thought that lower and upper portions of a plant's stem are genetically identical and produce different pitchers only because they are exposed to different conditions. Thus, I thought that irrespective of where the cutting came from, it would eventually produce both types of pitchers as it matured and began to vine.

    Similarly, I thought that any cutting would be capable of producing flowers once it became a mature plant.

    I GUESS I WAS WRONG ON BOTH COUNTS! Darn it. But my N.gracilis is vining like mad, and this info will come in handy should I ever decide to take cuttings.
    Secretary, New England Carnivorous Plant Society (NECPS) http://www.necps.org/
    Member, International Carnivorous Plant Society (ICPS)
    Member, North American Sarracenia Conservancy (NASC)
    Member, The Carnivorous Plant Society (CPS)

  2. #10
    srduggins's Avatar
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    Very good answers, but somewhat obscured is the fact that a cutting from a plant producing lower pitchers will eventually grow up and start producing upper pitchers and flowers. Like someone said, A cutting from an upper pitchering vine will eventually produce basals that have lower pitchers on them. So the plants are genetically identical, just different levels of maturity initially causing different types of growth.
    A day without Nepenthes is like a day without sunshine

    --steve

  3. #11

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    As steve says, cuttings and small plants will all grow up one day and produce upper pitchers and flowers. It's all part of these plants' life cycle. Some species are rapid growers, and you can watch a plant grow from seedling, into rosette with lower pitchers, into climbing vine with intermediate the upper pitchers, then flower. And eventually it will produce basal shoots which will repeat the process (normally in a shorter period, basal shoots tend to throw out uppers more quickly than seedling rosettes). This can happen in some species in 4 or so years, and in others it can take more than 10.
    Demystifying Nepenthes: http://www.nepenthesforeveryone.com

  4. #12

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    You'll get the gist of it soon, a benign symptom of "The Bug".

    Cheers

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