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Thread: Question about light

  1. #1

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    hey Quick question regarding lights for my nep plants... and yes i did try looking for the answer. i have a few gro & sho lights brigth stick from GE for growing plants.... now my question is, how effective are they? cause they dont seem as bright.... Thanks

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    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    Know the watts and output wavelengths they produce?

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    the watt is 33... iand i dont know the wavelength... the info that i got was that they were made for growing plants...

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    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    Try them out. If they don't seem as bright to us that is because, our inferior eyes cannot detect the light that plants need and can detect, so those lights probably emit a blueish/reddish light.

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    yeah they do.... and thats what they were made for... just that i sometimes dont think they are working... and the light is pinkish... so i just wanted to make sure that they do work....

    this is what i read about them, and it sounded good

    "Plant Growth Lights
    Epitomized by the Sylvania Gro-Lux ™ tube, plant growth lights are, unlike all other fluorescent tubes, meant solely for promoting plant growth; you won't find these illuminating somebody's home or office - with one exception. Where I work, a receptionist thought it would be nice to have pink lighting in the lobby and ordered and had installed some plant growth tubes. You do get used to it, but they are most disconcerting when initially encountered.

    GE's version of this tube is called "Gro-N-Sho", other plant growth tubes that are available are these tubes relabelled for specialty pet/aquarium companies. Gro-Lux type tubes have an output spectra with two large spikes. One in the blue, and one in the red portion of the spectra. There is almost no light emitted in any other portion of the spectra and as such, they cast an eerie purplish glow, and do not appear very bright. The spikes in the red and blue occur quite abruptly and are quite steep. This spectra was chosen as it matched the absorption of visible light by chlorophyll in a test tube. In the 50's a study was conducted on various lighting types and phosphor formulation on plant growth, the results of which were published in the book "Lighting for Optimal Plant Growth" (Kent State Press) The phosphor formulation of Gro-Lux type tubes was improved upon. Instead of two steep abrupt spikes in the red and blue, there are two slow rising large "bumps"; the peaks in the red and blue were not as high, nor did they rise as sharply. Instead of concentrating all the energy in these two narrow energy bands, the output was tuned to a wider output spectra still however, centered around red and blue. It became commercially available from Sylvania as Gro-Lux Wide Spectrum; GE named theirs Gro-N-Sho Wide Spectrum. These are more pinkish than purple and are indeed what is in the lobby of the building where I work.

    Since these tubes are quite commonly used for (non aquatic) houseplants they are reasonably common in hardware stores or nurseries, although what typically happens is a store will only sell one vendors fluorescent tubes. Even worse, they don't recognize the difference between plant lights and wide spectrum plant lights with the result being you will usually find plant lights or wide spectrum plant lights from one manufacturer in a store. Wide spectrum tubes are reasonably inexpensive, although regular Gro-Lux type tubes tend to be a bit more expensive still - the chemical that makes up the phosphor which produces red is the expensive part. In a pet shop these can be between $10 and $20. From a lighting supplier a Gro-Lux tube is about $9 while a wide spectrum tube is about $7

  6. #6
    Carnivorous Plants KCCPGUY
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    Glad I found this part of the forum.
    I have a terrarium with a bunch of Ns and a sundew. I have a GE brightstick
    grow and show on the top sunning down on the plants. The light case
    seems is on the dull side. I am pretty sure they are enough to get the
    plants growing but I am wondering if I should put in another
    gro stick?
    However a small pitcher from my N. gracilimas just started wilting and dying and I am wondering why the other pitchers are not producing more. Do I need more light?
    Dr. Eric Flescher
    Olathe, KS
    Dr. Eric Flescher, Olathe, KSdreric1kansas@aol.com)
    Eric's Carnivorous Plant Site
    http://www.xanga.com/kccpguy
    E.O.A.S. (Earth, Oceans, Atmosphere and Space Blog) <a href=\"http://www.xanga.com/dreric1kansas>[/URL\" target=\"_blank\">
    [URL=http://members.aol.com/kcstarg....omy.htm</a>

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