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Thread: N. ampullaria deteriovore

  1. #9

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    well,that mean ampullarias and all neps are omnivorous. what is happening is not by accident. Mother nature have pre-arranged for the way neps behave,esp ampullaria. It is the struggle for survival and only the fittest will survive. where conditions are right the pollen germinate. Those that happened to take root under trees with many foliage cover benefited the most while those in the open with slightest protection depend on crawlers and flies. The roots are runners underground and continuing to produce new growth,one cluster here ,another there,weeks and months past carpeting an area. Yes the finest example in the carnivorous plant kingdom:O



    ..Robert

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    I remember reading in Charles Clarke's book that the release of nutrients from leaves is a very slow process. The leaves that fall into the pitchers are quickly broken down by the various organisms that live in the fluid. The organisms secrete waste products that contain nitrogen, and that is where the pitchers get their nutrients from.

    I don't think the plant would benefit much from leaves without the organisms. The enzymes that the plant produces are designed to break apart the peptide bonds in protein in order to extract the Nitrogen from it. Leaves are low in protein, so the enzymes aren't much use.

    A person can't compare the digestive process of an animal to the digestive process in pitcher plants. Just because something has a lot of energy trapped in it doesn't mean the organisms can utilize it efficiently. Wood has a lot of stored energy, and yet I can chew on it all day and get very little from it. It's true that noting is wasted. If I ate wood, It would pass through my system, and the energy would be transferred to micro organisms.

    Brian

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    I believe that the microorganisms and bacteria in milk should be sufficient to break down the vegetative matter, shouldn't it? I've fed quite a few of my plants lettuce, carrots, bannana peels, grapes, and some other salad stuff. I will monitor their growth to see if there are any changes.

  4. #12
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    For humans, utilizing fats produces more calories (energy) than protein and carbohydrates (plant matter). Simply put, consuming a pound of butter will yeild far more energy than a pound of lettuce. In fact, for humans, lettuce and celery have almost zero nutritional value because they are composed largely of cellulose which the human digestive system cannot break down.

    But as Brian said,

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]A person can't compare the digestive process of an animal to the digestive process in pitcher plants. Just because something has a lot of energy trapped in it doesn't mean the organisms can utilize it efficiently.
    Absolutely. From what I've read, nepenthes pitcher fluid contains mostly peptidases which cleave peptides (proteins). Evolutionarily, this makes sense considering the plants' main source of nitrogen is from insects which are composed largely of protein. The pitcher fluid has very little (or no) cellulases and lipases needed to digest cellulose and fats, respectively. But it may be home to bacteria that have those enzymes, which may give the pitcher the ability to "indirectly" digest dead leaves.

    That said, I foliar feed my neps with fertilizer, so all of this is a moot issue for me! But it's still interesting to discuss....
    Secretary, New England Carnivorous Plant Society (NECPS) http://www.necps.org/
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    Hi guys. Ok. I am noticing veeeeeeery large growth on my N. rafflesiana giant. The conditions have been the same. Same light, and almost no change in temps, with slightly higher humidity. Ever since I got my rafflesiana its been steadily increasing in size, about 1" or less gain per leaf. As you know, I fed two of its pitcher with lettuce, carrots, grapes, and some other small salad stuff. This newest leaf is big, 3-4" longer than the last, and still growing! It would apear that the next leaf on my khasiana x truncata (gave it the same treatment) will be quite a bit larger as well. If you ask me, I think the vegie feeding has been a great success. I believe the grapes were the best thing. I should also note that I have also been using superthrive more regularly, and the humidity has been higher, so it wasn't a controled experiment. But whatever is causing the tremendous growth, I hope it continues [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_n_32.gif[/img] !

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]I am noticing veeeeeeery large growth on my N. rafflesiana giant....and khasiana x truncata
    That's great to hear! Just curious--do you have a N.rafflesiana or khasiana x truncata under similar conditions and being fed food that you normally use? If so, what's their growth rate relative to those being fed the veggies?

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]But whatever is causing the tremendous growth, I hope it continues
    I think the same thing whenever one of my plants starts a growth spurt. It's incredible how tempermental some plants can be. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]
    Secretary, New England Carnivorous Plant Society (NECPS) http://www.necps.org/
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    Look how much larger the leaf is! Over 4" longer than the last. You can see the tinge of red on the light green leaf which tells you it's getting plenty of light. I can only contribute the boon in growth to what I've been feeding it.


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    deeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaammmmmmm
    [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_k_ani_32.gif[/img]
    \"Nepenthes, the Devil's Cup\" - Santos
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