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Thread: N. ramispina

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    Lord Humungus's Avatar
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    My N. ramispina was doing great. Now it is winter time I brought them inside. Now it's dying. Why so quickly. They are high land witch like cold nights. In Jacksonville in the night are hot in the summer. it's cooler in the house.
    I'm still living off the corpse of the old world.

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    I don't know anything about this nep, but my neps are outside and doing fine. But then again Jacksonville is probably different from Miami.

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    In my experience, ramispina is very tough, so it must be shock or some big factor like that. Maybe it is not getting enough light inside. Maybe it has been hit with flyspray, it could be a number of things.
    Demystifying Nepenthes: http://www.nepenthesforeveryone.com

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    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    I vote for a humidity drop and/or root rot.

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    Low humidity, even a drop from constant high humidity wouldn't kill ramispina, it would just cause the leaves to wilt. Root rot, on the other hand, would be fatal. Is the plant sitting in saucers of water which are constantly full?
    Demystifying Nepenthes: http://www.nepenthesforeveryone.com

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    I keep my ramispina outdoors yearround here in So. Calif. It's gotten into the upper 30's and ramispina does fine. I recently got a smaller ramispina and potted it up and put it outdoors under shade cloth. The leaves wilted and it stressed for 2 days. Then it rebounded and looks great. Ramispina is a pretty tough plant. Can you leave it outdoors through winter where you live? If not, find a sunny windowsill for the really cold nights.

    Joel
    Nepenthes Around the House

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    Lord Humungus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (SydneyNeps @ Dec. 04 2005,3:27)]Low humidity, even a drop from constant high humidity wouldn't kill ramispina, it would just cause the leaves to wilt. Root rot, on the other hand, would be fatal. Is the plant sitting in saucers of water which are constantly full?
    All mt Nep are hanging with no trays under them. All my Neps stop picturing when I bring them in. Only ramispina started dying. They are getting sun light in the room I keep them in.
    I'm still living off the corpse of the old world.

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    chloroplast's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]They are getting sun light in the room I keep them in.
    How much sunlight? Most plants don't get nearly as much light when kept indoors even when next to a window, and far less if kept a distance from windows. Good lighting is one of the requirements for pitcher production.

    Are you heating your home? If not, I doubt humidity would be much of an issue since humidity indoors should be near what it is outdoors (where the plants were pitchering). Too bad your plants are on hangers; otherwise, you could place them on moist pebble trays to increase local humidity (to rule-out humidity as a factor).

    Alternatively, they just may be adjusting to the new conditions in your home. Neps sometimes stop pitchering when moved to new conditions (and may lose a few existing leaves or pitchers in the process).
    Secretary, New England Carnivorous Plant Society (NECPS) http://www.necps.org/
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