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Thread: Pitchering in winter time

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Question: Does anybody know if Neps continue to pitcher, in their natural habitats - or maybe if it's just the highland Neps that cease pitchering, while the lowland ones do?

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    白人看不懂 Drosera36's Avatar
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    I would assume the warmer it is, the more they pitcher. There's a topic 'bout N. ampullaria (highland or lowland?) that someone rescued from the wild, and appears to be pitchering. Here's the post.
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    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    I have terrible pitchering productivity now. Number one because I have the darkest days anyone has seen and secondly because it is difficult to heat in the cold months. So 2 parts of a Nepenthes requirements are on the fritz, temp and photoperiod. In their natural habitat Nepenthes never really stop pitchering unless there is a drought or something similar.

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (nepenthes gracilis @ Dec. 04 2005,2:46)]In their natural habitat Nepenthes never really stop pitchering unless there is a drought or something similar.
    Even the highland ones? I know they don't go dormant, but as we both know, many plants slowdown during the winter. So would you say that if a Nep has ceased pitchering, then it is genuinely unhappy, as opposed to just in a slow period of a natural cycle?

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    VFT and Drosera lover vft guy in SJ's Avatar
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    Correct me if Im wrong, but I always thought that the tropics had a fairly consistant weather cycle. They dont have a "winter" with shorter days and colder temps... its pretty much the same year round. Highlands are able to take the cooler temps not because of "winter" but altitude.
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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (vft guy in SJ @ Dec. 04 2005,3:31)]Correct me if Im wrong, but I always thought that the tropics had a fairly consistant weather cycle. They dont have a "winter" with shorter days and colder temps... its pretty much the same year round. Highlands are able to take the cooler temps not because of "winter" but altitude.
    Steve, I know what you mean; they get more of a differential from day/night, as opposed to seasonal. Are they all that close to the Equator, so as to not have any appreciable seasonality?

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    Yes, all Neps (bar maybe three species) live within the equatorial belt. The only three that fall close to the edge of the tropics are an Australian variant of mirabilis, vieillardii which is the southernmost species and khasiana which is the northernmost. However, they are still within the Tropics of Capricorn and Cancer so they still have fairly consistent temperatures and daylight hours.
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Even the highland ones? I know they don't go dormant, but as we both know, many plants slowdown during the winter.
    My neps are slowing down this winter because I grow them in my basement and it stays consistently cool during the winter. The nightime lows are around 62F, which is just fine. However, the daytime highs rarely exceed 70F. In the native climate, the highland temperatures may dip down, but the daytime temps are warm, which stimulates their metabolism.

    I think consisently cool temps in the winter is what slows them down. I was even thinking of putting a small electric heater in the room to warm it up a bit during the day.

    Brian

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