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Thread: rafflesiana of Lundu

  1. #9

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    well,no threat at the moment.There are some cuttings of young trees for firewoods. I didn't notice a single destruction of neps plant, save for some pulling that doesn't cause death. If there is a threat in future that would be building of hotels and resorts, This place is far and isolated. we have better place for resorts, so it's save.::

    Nice to note the dark raff., i saw some young plant with baby pitchers around the matured plant with same coloration.

  2. #10

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    Yes the last raff almost looks like its crossed with sanguinea.
    Lovely photos BTW.
    And Rubra it isnt that strange that you rarely see rafflesiana uppers in cultivation, because it grows huge, and I mean really HUGE.
    Need all the experience I can get...

  3. #11
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    Woah. Now I know why I like rafs! Those are wonderful plants (and good photos, too)!
    17 Nash Rd.
    North Salem, NY 10560

    YOU! Outta my gene pool!

  4. #12
    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    I've only seen raff uppers at Mike Catalani's ********. And his plants were ENORMOUS.

  5. #13

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    That chocolate raff on the bottom is indeed yummy (pun) [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_n_32.gif[/img]
    It's so brown, I thought for a sec it was dead, lol.

    Cheers,

    Joe

  6. #14

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    Joe,me too [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_m_32.gif[/img]. when i first saw it i wasn't giving a second look.My friend
    found out while investigating the smaller pitchers

    Robert

  7. #15

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    hi,
    thanks for all the pics, love raffs, and those are wonderful, the number of varieties are really uncountable!
    Anyway, just wanted to ask relating the giant forms, what is the most stable characteristic used to determine one? is it the colour of the youngest leaf?
    And I know its really difficult to 'classify' but what is the largest 'typical' form you came by so far? those in the pics are large btw
    And what about elongata?
    Do all these 3 'classes' grow under slightly different conditions? (eg moisture, lighting)
    Thanks

  8. #16

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    Hi Lam. I am unsure if the leaves alone can determine the pitcher's forms. Some young elongata plant have red brown leaves.Typical type are green throughout.

    The measurement-typical pitcher have equal length as their leaves ie 7" to 8" with short tendril roughly 3"-4".Giant and elongata have approx pitcher's length of 13" and leaves are long.

    Conditions are the same throughout the area. The land is flat and sandy fed with small streams and underlayer water bed with brackish waters. There are many pool of brackish water collection where some roots of gracilis,mirabilis,hybrids and rafs are slightly submerged in water. Moisture and lighting affecting the different forms are same throughout. Certainly the alkalinity and winds from the sea are a plus. The area lies between south china sea and the Gading national park.

    Hope these explain.

    Robert

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