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Thread: OSMOCOTE Testing on Nepenthes SUCCESSFULLY!

  1. #33
    MrAga73's Avatar
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    Nepenthes_gracilis,
    my question is another : ( I was not able to let me understand).
    If for example I put some soap ONLY into one plant pitchers....in your opinion what would happen?
    The pitcher would die or the entire plant?
    Are Nepenthes able to absorb from "what falls into their pitchers" only what really needs for its grow ?
    This is my question,do you have any idea?

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  2. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]If for example I put some soap ONLY into one plant pitchers....in your opinion what would happen?
    The pitcher would die or the entire plant?
    Are Nepenthes able to absorb from "what falls into their pitchers" only what really needs for its grow ?
    This is my question,do you have any idea?
    My understanding is that nepenthes pitchers selectively translocate ("absorb") substances impermeable to plant cell walls via transport channels. Cell wall-permeable substances can enter the plant passively.

    I would imagine that most soaps (surfactants) 1) could not be absorbed and 2) would eventually kill the pitcher. Thus, the pitcher would die but the plant would not absorb the soap and thus survive.

    I've never tried adding soap to a pitcher so this is just an educated guess.
    Secretary, New England Carnivorous Plant Society (NECPS) http://www.necps.org/
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    Try wiith a cheap ventrata or something then [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]
    Need all the experience I can get...

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    Ok,I will try one day if I will not receive an answer from somebody who has alredy try!

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    Post

    AND SO NOW IT IS THE END OF A LONG STORY :



    Forum of ********** : Just have a look at this plant!
    Now this Nepenthes is a very beautyfull plant!
    Did you remember 6 months ago? It is incredible,isn't?
    Yes...OSMOCOTE did its work very fine!
    It helped the plant to come out from sufferences!
    If you have nice pictures just post here in this tread.
    See you and big greetings from Italy!

    Mr_Aga
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  6. #38

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    Hey Gang,

    Thought I'd add my 2cents worth as I also played with Osmocote and did have somewhat of a control group....

    These are 15 month old (since seed was laid) N. ventricosa x khasiana seedlings (suspect ID on the Khasi as I've never viewed the adult male). They were potted up individually in about September/October 2005.

    When potting I added Osmocote to 6 of the new seedlings at a rate of 3 pellets per plant placed double the leaf distance from the plant.

    The Osmocote is for Australian Natives and has a N:P:K of 15:4.4:10. Pellets are all the same colour.

    Results are in the photos:

    Photo 1. are some of the hybrid seedlings that did NOT get Osmocote:


    Photo 2. are the same seedlings, but that DID get Osmocote (note that the one in the middle back did not):


    Photo 3. shows some pure N. ventricosa seedlings. The one on the left got none and the 4x on the right were treated the same as the above hybrids. However, all 5 were potted some months earlier and are a good 6 months older than the hybrids:


    In terms of the Neps, its quite clear the difference in growth. Both the leaves and pitchers are substantially larger in those that received Osmocote. What is not quite as clear is the colour. Those with Osmocote are MUCH greener and look healthier and more robust overall.

    In terms of the soil... you can see that moss is the less favorable variety in the pots WITH Osmocate. I suspect that the potting mix is also breaking down much quicker in those with Osmocote, so although they are growing bigger and faster, they will also be forced in to repotting earlier.

    So I think that fixes the control issue, at least in these two very hardy varieties of Nep.

    I am also about to do the same treatment to half of the following seedlings I have ready for their first potting:

    N. ventricosa x alata (striped)
    N. ventricosa x (albomarginata x vietchii)

    AJ

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    Hi Aaron:

    Very nice experiment. this is something i would have done myself, if i had more time to play with my neps.
    I would like to congratulate you for your effort

    I think the most difficult part is to interpret the results.
    It is obvious that Osmocote has improved the growth and general well being of some of your seedlings. However, nothing in life is absolute
    Not all plants that received osmocote have developed and grown at the same rate otherwise, all plants should have doubled in size and not just the majority. As a matter of fact, there are a couple which look just as those in the osmocote-free group.

    It's always good to note that even though the Osmocote treated plants have outgrown those which did not have any.
    the most dramatic effect seen is a "doubling in size" in the plants treated with this fertilizer.

    The only feasible conclusion i can draw at this stage is that if a plant has the genetic predisposition to grow more vigorously than another, osmocote will definitely help. But if the plant has the genetic predisposition to be "a runt" there is very little that osmocote can do.

    Gus

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    Gus,

    The smallest of the treated plants is, at minimum, equal to the biggest of the untreated (irrespective of how the pics may make it look). In fact in those pics there is only one treated specimen that is small enough to say it is equal to the largest untreated specimen.

    It is also possible that the smallest treated specimens were substantially smaller then the larger untreated ones when they were posted up. So although they may appear the same size now the treated may have still increased more in size proportionally to the untreated.

    However, as you noted, genetic variability also plays a role. Growth rates are of the plants not even close equal in either of the two samples. Even prior to potting up there was a clear differential in size between the smallest and biggest of any individual plant from the same seed batch and in the same seed tray.

    As for time to do it.... was nothing really. I had the seedlings sitting there, so figured why not throw some Osmocote in and see what happens. It was certainly never intended to be anything overly scientific. It was more just happenstance when I ended up with so many seedlings from the same seed batches and had enough for a small sample size of each.

    So all other possible variables aside, its still pretty clear what effect the Osmocote is ‘capable’ of having on this hybrid and species.

    Maybe I should get the vernier out for the next test batch to make sure I get accurate measurements in leaf and pitcher size increased proportional to the starting size

    AJ

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