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Thread: Rooting cuttings

  1. #9
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    AS long as you put just enough moisture in the soil for it to be moist but not waterlogged, and then place it in a bag with the cutting, the humidity will staty high, and you wont haave to worry about over or under watering the media.

  2. #10
    War. War never changes. Est's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]There is the constant battle between needing constant moisture and the tendency to rot...this is where the strong light comes into play...must kill off some of the rot...keep trying.
    It started a good while ago while we were still having awesome weather. That thing was getting sun and contant humidity, was cut with sterile razors, I tried rooting hormone, many different substrates, I cut off excess foliage (because it grew quite a bit)... No matter what I did, nor in what combination I did, the cut areas would turn brown. I KNOW I've had it in good conditions because it's grown considerable (it has the apical meristem.) Dunno, I think it may have just been a cutting from hell. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/confused.gif[/img] By now I've pretty much given up because it (of course) is growing a lot less and is losing the fight.
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    I don't know whether it's in fact helpful or merely apocryphal, but I keep my cuttings in lower light conditions for about a month or so after taking them. The theory is that high light levels promote leaf growth, which detracts from root formation. The lower light allows the cutting to concentrate on roots. The lower light it also a more gentle way of treating a cutting as it doesn't have the means of regulating temperature as a rooted plant would.

    I also support the comments that mildly damp & humid is enough. Waterlogging is a good way of rotting cuttings. They don't need much moisture as they don't have the roots to absorb it.
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  4. #12
    War. War never changes. Est's Avatar
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    Hmm. For the most part it's been either in a tank with good humidity or in a large ziplock bag behind my sliding glass door (which between being warped and fairly thick blocks a good amount of light.) I suppose that light/heat is the least altered variable in my case... Even despite being grown in pure pumice, I believe the stemp has still turned brown (haven't really checked since.)

    Thanks for all the tips, if I find it didn't take, then I'll try it in a bit lower light setting and keep the current airy substrate. Fc, you've got a lot of good info here! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]
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  5. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (SydneyNeps @ Jan. 09 2006,12:02)]I don't know whether it's in fact helpful or merely apocryphal, but I keep my cuttings in lower light conditions for about a month or so after taking them. The theory is that high light levels promote leaf growth, which detracts from root formation. The lower light allows the cutting to concentrate on roots. The lower light it also a more gentle way of treating a cutting as it doesn't have the means of regulating temperature as a rooted plant would.

    I also support the comments that mildly damp & humid is enough. Waterlogging is a good way of rotting cuttings. They don't need much moisture as they don't have the roots to absorb it.
    That's interesting...I will try this some time. I admit, my method seems dangerous but nonetheless I have good success. It may be that my GH is located in full sun and the plants' only shade is from structural components and other plants. Maybe this illustrates Nepenthes' overall adaptability to many different situations.
    Ludwig

  6. #14
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    There is one experienced grower who puts her Nep cuttings in a vase and treats it like a rosebud - with success - all rootrot aside.

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    Cuttings can be taken in water for those species which grow and root quickly, like gracilis and x Ventrata. I'm sure there are other lowland species which would work well. But many highland species can be particularly slow to root, and standing them in water for that length of time would be more likely to see them rot before rooting.
    Demystifying Nepenthes: http://www.nepenthesforeveryone.com

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    but will circulating new water help?
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