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Thread: How to get 'tiny leave big pitchers' on neps

  1. #1

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    Hi guys,

    Has anyone noticed that certain species particularly ampularia in the wild have TINY leaves and big pitchers?

    For example:
    N gracilis:

    N gracilis

    Pics of amps in the wild, singaporean forum:
    WoW!

    It often leads to a carpet of pitchers with no leaves, which are awesome! Anyone have these kind of plants in cultivation?
    What's your secret/experiences in obtaining such attractive neps?

    Thanks,
    wezx
    A lady went into a grocery store and looked into the turket section. She needed a bigger one for her family, so she asks the stock boy: \"Do these turkeys get any bigger?\"

    The stock boy replied: \"No ma'am, they're dead\"

    Msn/email - wezx1@hotmail.com

  2. #2

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    In the case of ampullaria, it is part of its growth habit. For other species, it is most often influenced by high light levels.
    Demystifying Nepenthes: http://www.nepenthesforeveryone.com

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (wezx @ Jan. 16 2006,11:56)]Hi guys,

    Has anyone noticed that certain species particularly ampularia in the wild have TINY leaves and big pitchers?

    For example:
    N gracilis:

    N gracilis

    Pics of amps in the wild, singaporean forum:
    WoW!

    It often leads to a carpet of pitchers with no leaves, which are awesome! Anyone have these kind of plants in cultivation?
    What's your secret/experiences in obtaining such attractive neps?

    Thanks,
    wezx
    Hi,
    both of these plants, as well as their hybrid trichocarpa do this with their basals, totally natural.
    just give your plant more time.

  4. #4

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    Hi i agreed with Lam and Hamish explanation and observation. It also happened to rafflesiana. Perhaps due to adaptation. One such an example,illustrated with photo, is rafflesiana (squat). The area was partially in water due to rain,flood, high tide causing water level of rivers and streams to rise and resulting in lowland flood. It is a combination of one or more above factors and it happens every month.

    Note there are 3 basals. Still no uppers formation are noticeable at this stage.



    Robert [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]

  5. #5

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    Thanks guys
    so the solution is to just wait [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img]
    A lady went into a grocery store and looked into the turket section. She needed a bigger one for her family, so she asks the stock boy: \"Do these turkeys get any bigger?\"

    The stock boy replied: \"No ma'am, they're dead\"

    Msn/email - wezx1@hotmail.com

  6. #6

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    Nice photo, Robert. Is it possible though that there is some N. ampullaria in that plant? That would explain why it looks like a "squat" form of rafflesiana.

    Regards,

    Christer

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    yes that plant looks alot like hookeriana because if the invert peristom and the shape of the leaves. I doubt that that is a pure Rafflesiana.
    Need all the experience I can get...

  8. #8

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    well,i have searched and found no ampullaria within the proximity. A huge area yet to be covered by walking many miles through the shrubs,finally some wooded forest. A likely place to encounter ampullaria.

    Robert

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