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Thread: Ventricosa x Aristolochioides

  1. #17
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    not bad! but I still would LOVE to get the aristolocoides pure. Ventricosa atleast for me isn''t that "pretty" of a nep. Thats just what I feel. I understand many here will disagree.
    It's a rather dull plant, with the exception of some of the selectively bred clones (although I'd say some of those are downright hideous) but it's great for hybridizing because it makes the offspring almost bombproof. I wouldn't have any N. aristolochioides DNA in my collection at all if it wasn't for the mother helping out.

    Now we just need to cross it with another N. aristolochioides and see what happens

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    I wouldn't call sibuyanensis pure highland. As you know, Philippines neps tend to go both ways. I, as well as some others, grow sibuyanensis lowland with no problems.
    Z polski y dumny
    Prayer - how to do nothing and still think you're helping.
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  3. #19

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    Hi Ron:

    As you also know that for every statement there is an exception. Although phillippino highlands tend to withstand the heat a bit more than other highland counterparts found elsewhere, there are exceptions to the rule as i would not expect a mira or argentii to grow under lowland conditions. There's so much we can stretch the phillipino species Ron, and when we say grow well, meaning:

    1) the plant has not die yet or it looks OK but without pitchers or with reduced size pitchers
    2) the plant is growing well and producing regular size pitchers proportional to the leaves

    also the higher the plant is found the more highland it becomes whether it is the phillippines or papua new guinea

    Gus

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    1) the plant has not die yet or it looks OK but without pitchers or with reduced size pitchers
    This can be thrown out unless you have specific averages of multiple measurements taken at various stages of growth for multiple plants, with multiple leaf sizes, in various conditions....which I'm assuming you don't have....

    As you also know that for every statement there is an exception
    Agreed. And with your statements at least, truncata is an exception. "Highland" truncata will grow quite well under lowland conditions...there is no disputing this. Have you grown a "highland" truncata outside in 100+ degrees for 4 months (and 80+ for an additional 2) with under 20% humidity every day? I have. Pitchers (and leaves) were not reduced, and actually got progressively larger (as they should). Ironically, you know what killed it? COLD! I know you might say "six months isn't a good enough time frame", but trust me, it is, especially with humidity that low. I have no clue what conditions you have, but I'm sure other lowland growers (even those with higher humidity) can back me up with the fact that a highland plant won't do good (not even making smaller leaves) in pure lowland conditions for 6 entire months, then randomly die out of nowhere
    I realize I'm getting quite descriptive, but I feel it necessary, save you bring up some random point I perhaps haven't covered, forcing me to spend time explaining things on the contrary.
    Z polski y dumny
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  5. #21
    Carnivorous plant enthusiast vraev's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JustLikeAPill View Post
    It's a rather dull plant, with the exception of some of the selectively bred clones (although I'd say some of those are downright hideous) but it's great for hybridizing because it makes the offspring almost bombproof. I wouldn't have any N. aristolochioides DNA in my collection at all if it wasn't for the mother helping out.

    Now we just need to cross it with another N. aristolochioides and see what happens
    yeah! hopefully more of the aristo pitcher shape would be restored by that cross.

  6. #22

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    Hi Ron:

    Regarding your statement with a sibuyanensis growing for 6 months under lowland conditions, just shows that you have not had this plant long enough. In general, most lowlands can grow under highland conditions for at least 1 year or 2, but in the end, they'll die due to cold weather and viceversa with highlands grown under lowland conditions. So if i were you, i'd wait another year before you can triumphantly show us your sibuyanensis with beautiful pitchers.

    2) Assuming you are quite right with your description of sibuyanensis as an intermediate plant, then it still does not explain why aristolochioides mixed with ventricosa still behaves as a highland which was my original statement

    Cheers,

    Gus

  7. #23

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    Ah Ron: one more thing. Truncata is the typical example why some phillippino species can grow well under lowland and highland conditions. There is no such thing as a highland truncata just a truncata variant found at high altitudes which can grow well under cold and heat. This example can fit well a species found between 1000 to 1600 metres in general. Anything above 1600 would have to behave as highland even if it's found in the phillippines. In other words, if it's found at low altitudes in the phillippines may grow well in cold up to 1600 metres. I don't think we can assume the opposite situation.

    Gus

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    most lowlands can grow under highland conditions for at least 1 year or 2, but in the end, they'll die due to cold weather and viceversa
    False. Look at photos from RC or *******....I can't even count how many highlanders RC grows under lowland conditions. This line of thinking is back in the dark ages of Nepenthes culture. There are also people on CPUK who have grown sib for a looooot longer than I have under lowland conditions and have nice plants. Looking at people like RC, and Cap's viking that he grows under highland conditions etc....with a very few exceptions, there are no boundaries. Thinking there are because you have been told so just halts progress, and just because you fail once or twice doesn't make something impossible
    Z polski y dumny
    Prayer - how to do nothing and still think you're helping.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5F5aCUNE4Z8
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