User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: N. hamata growing

  1. #1
    Moderator Cindy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    2,435
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Talking

    I have done my research on the Internet and was convinced like many others that this plants have got thin leaves and need cool temperatures and high humidity.

    I bought one recently and took all care to keep it cool and keep the humidity high (90%). What I got in return was the growing tip becoming mouldy and turning black and the oldest leaf turning brown halfway.

    This plant is from Malesiana and I got this information from the senior biologist there.
    ""Our highland Nepenthes are grown under 50% top-shade in an otherwise open mosquito-screen house, i.e., the receive full rain, UV, wind and lateral (early morning and late afternoon) sun. Averagem minimum night time temperature is 16C with occasional dips to 14C; maximum average day time temperature is 32C with occasional rises to 34C. These are shade temperatures and in daytime equate to c. 38C in sun. Humidity ranges from c. 55% in the early afternoon to supersaturated (mist) at dawn. The most important considerations for successful growing of highland species in the lowlands are providing a diurnal temperature range (ours is on average 16C); ensuring that the plants receive enough light (especially UV) while keeping the leaves cool (highlanders grow in more-or-less full sun but he constant air movement prevents overheating) and providing sufficient humidity. Most people growing highland species at low elevations usually balance shading with regular misting of the plants and have accept that they cannot grow in full sun which while not a major problem generally means that the pitchers are not quite so intensely coloured as in a higher UV situation."

    No wonder! When I received the plant, I noticed that the leaves on my N. hamata was actually quite thick (as thick as the N. ephippiata and N. ovata leaves - the other neps that came with the same order). I was totally baffled because I have read time and again that N. hamata has got thin leaves. However, when I compared it to my N. mirabilis, the N. mirabilis has got thinner leaves. It is pitchering while flapping in the wind at my balcony!

    In reply to my query in another thread, dewy gave me a link to how elgecko grows his N. hamata.
    ""Winter humidity: 30 - 50% (lower humidity in the day. Furnace does not run much, sun shines in the room where I grow the plants. I have a humidifier on my furnace set to around 45%)

    Winter / Fall temps: I keep the house cool. Heat set to around 63 degrees. (humidified air feels warmer then dry air) During the day it can hit mid 70's with the sun shinning in the room where I grow the hamata. Nights can drop to low 60's.

    Spring / Summer / Fall humidity: 40 - high 80%. (Windows open and such)

    Spring / Summer temps: I would say low 70's to mid 80's. (I usually have the A/C set around 74) "

    I am going ahead to grow my N. hamata in the conditions stated above. I am living in lowland Singapore but my balcony has got good light and high humidity. Windy all year round. In the day, the plant will be in the open at my balcony. In the night, the plant will go into the wine chiller with a plastic cover. Hope all things will go well and I will post the results here.

    I am just ranting because there has been lots of information out there on the Internet that are not up-to-date. Not wrong because that's probably how N. hamata grows in the wild but over time growers have managed to grow it as an intermediate and even as a windowsill plant! I definitely feel more enlightened now. To think that I almost killed the plant by giving it too much humidity! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_l_32.gif[/img]
    Cindy

  2. #2
    Cardiac Nurse JB_OrchidGuy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    SC
    Posts
    3,818
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Just another example of the info out there not being what exactly the plant is capable of growing and prospering in. Also what works for me may not work for my neighbor. Thanks for the info.
    JB
    Friend me on facebook with JB_orchidguy@yahoo.com.
    Growlist Updated 05/08/13

  3. #3
    swords's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Cernunnos Woods
    Posts
    8,121
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    What you need to understand is these plants that they are talking about are experiencing air movement, in a closed terrarium they do not generally have good circulation. Indeed cold and damp does lead to rot but coupled with moving air it becomes boyant and will actually keep rot at bay.

    Believe it or not, my N. hamata does not like those temperatures listed by malesiana which are similar to what it experiences in my summer months even with air circulation and proper humidity. What will your backup plan be if the plant you are experimenting with suffers in the wrong conditions, are you willing to sacrifice the money in hopes that it will work out? What is wrong with setting up the proper environment?

  4. #4
    Moderator Cindy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    2,435
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/laugh.gif[/img] swords, my lesson learnt for this N. hamata growing thingy is that I should have contacted Malesiana earlier and my plant would not have to suffer. The plant has probably been hardened to those conditions and by over-pampering it, I could have lost it.

    The plant is really small at about 2" but it came with two nicely formed pitchers. That means it was doing well before it came to me. I am thankful that it was grown in the open and not in a greenhouse where everything is controlled. Ummm...no backup plan. I am trying to give it conditions as similar as I can to Malesiana's. Expensive plant, yes. But if I can't grow it here in the open or with minimum hassle, I would not grow it again. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_n_32.gif[/img] Unless the price plunges in a couple of years' time... [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_m_32.gif[/img]
    Cindy

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •