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Thread: dried out pitcher tops

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    moonflower's Avatar
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    recently i've noticed a trend in a few random neps i've seen... the top of the pitcher will dry out and look brown while the bottom looks perfectly healthy. my juvenile ventricosa does this (sort of- the tops are just slightly more wrinkled than the bottoms), a Miranda i saw at a flower show recently had brown tops, and i think i even saw them in a picture of a ventrata here in the forums.

    any particular reason why this happens?
    "Seeds? Oh yeah... sometimes I forget they grow from those. I feel like they should hatch or something."

    ~a friend's observation of my CP's

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Heather, could you refresh our memories as to how you are growing them? I mean, are you employing a terrarium set up or a hanging basket at a window sill or...?

    Mine are exhibiting that as well, but I can point to lack of water, perhaps low humidity. I think the light could be a little better. I am only using sunlight through a southern exposure window sill.

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    srduggins's Avatar
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    That happenned to mine when I was feeding them koi pellets. It can also happen in low humidity environments after the pitchers get a little older.
    A day without Nepenthes is like a day without sunshine

    --steve

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    chloroplast's Avatar
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    That eventually happens to my pitchers after several weeks/months and is a normal result of pitcher ageing. Most people keep the pitchers on until they've completely died, as they can still absorb nutrients from their bases.

    Low humidity or light, overly wet conditions, and/or disease can all cause a pitcher to prematurely die.
    Secretary, New England Carnivorous Plant Society (NECPS) http://www.necps.org/
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    endparenthesis's Avatar
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    Welcome to winter in nep-land. I don't have a good high-humidity setup so that's basically how most of my plants look this time of year.

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    Yep. Low humidity is the biggest culprit. It is also how a pitcher ages.

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    moonflower's Avatar
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    mmm low humidity makes a lot of sense... growing on a desktop in a dorm room that averages 90 degrees F would dry them out. maybe i'll mist them more...

    thanks a bunch!
    "Seeds? Oh yeah... sometimes I forget they grow from those. I feel like they should hatch or something."

    ~a friend's observation of my CP's

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    nepenthes_ak's Avatar
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    any temp change?

    Dont know if thats a factor...

    Cheers

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