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Thread: hamata, easy to root?

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    rattler's Avatar
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    title says it all. out of curiosity what species are known to be easy and what ones are difficult to root cuttings?
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    N.gracilis is an easy species to root and based on my experience N. x edinensis is really easy to root.

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    alata is easy, fusca x veitchii seems rather slow. I would think that the easy growers are easy to root, ventricosa, maxima, ramispina. Slow growers would be more difficult: lowii, rajah. I've heard conflicting reports on aristo, but the tip cutting is said to be easier than cuttings lower down the vine.
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    Hamata is easy to root. I've know people who've had lots of problems with aristo, but I've never lost a cutting. I do my cuttings at the end of winter, which seems to help enormously. Tip cuttings, or lateral/basal shoots are the way to go. I've found eymae a bit tricky - cuttings with dormant nodes will root easily then die when the node doesn't grow, but tip cuttings are easy. N. rowanae can be very temperamental from cuttings.
    Demystifying Nepenthes: http://www.nepenthesforeveryone.com

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    VFT and Drosera lover vft guy in SJ's Avatar
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    If a basil shoot counts as a cutting then I'd have to say that yes its very easy to root.

    Check out mine here: N. hamata post

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    Steve
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    swords's Avatar
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    Up until this last cutting season I had always had great success rooting almost any Nep using a 10 minute soak in water with vit B based stress formula and potting in pure shredded sphagnum. Well this year I didn't have any Vit B onhand so I used some rooting powder they have at Home Depot. Disaster city! I NEVER lost so many cuttings! Out of all my cuttings I was able to save about 30% and I blame it on this powder. The ones I unpotted washed and repotted have survived. I'll never do that again. Hormex liquid and Superthrive is the same thing with different patents and I've used both with great success over the last 4+ years for making cuttings. I'd never done the rooting power before and never will again.

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    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    I second that, rooting powder sucks!

    Josh what is your solution mix, straight SuperThrive?




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    Initially, just a couple drops of ST or Hormex liquid to a liter or two of room temp or even slightly warm (but not over 80*F) water.

    Cut up the stems into 1 and 2 node pieces, cut all the leaves in half, make a few vertical slices with a sharp sterile blade on the lower 1" of the stems and soak in the solution-you'll notice the cuttings seem to firm up/plump as they absorb the mixture. After pulling them out of the nutrient bath I do like to quickly dip the slit end of the stem into a small vial of the pure liquid just before planting (I dunno about letting it soak in the pure stuff, that could be too much). After dipping I wrap the slit end of the stem snugly with long fibered sphagnum, making sure the potted cutting doesn't wobble when picked up and moved. Thois ensures there is good contact between the substrate and the emerging roots.

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