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Thread: Cedar Mulch VS Orchid bark/Coco husk

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    swords's Avatar
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    I was looking for some mulch to put over some rescued wildflowers I ordered from Wood's End Rescue and of course, mulch only comes in palate sized loads... I found some "all natural/untreated" Cedar Mulch which is shredded into very small pieces almost like coco fiber (not quite that fine). I was curious if I'd be able to use this stuff in my soil mixes without any detrimental side effects? I use orchid bark in everything from houseplants to Nepenthes and I have about 20 lbs left over after covering 4 planters.

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    I "think" Trent Meeks recommended a similar product that he has in Florida.

    Cheers,

    Joe

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    swords's Avatar
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    Just by playing with the stuff, I think it would be amazing all by itself for highlanders especially (rapid as heck drainage but holds a nice amount of water) with just a top dressing of shredded live sphagnum as a wetness indicator. I just wonder if anyone knows if it has any salts or other deviant nutrients that may not be immediately apparent.

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    I think that would all depend on the source.

    I'd test it out on a few throw away plants (D. capensis, U. livida, D. spatulata, etc.) Then if things go well start trying it on other plants that you have spares of.
    \"Anyway, no drug, not even alcohol, causes the fundamental ills of society. If we're looking for the source of our troubles, we shouldn't test people for drugs, we should test them for stupidity, ignorance, greed and love of power.\"
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    swords's Avatar
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    It's called "Nature's Harvest Cedar Mulch". Looks as if it's packaged in Maine. the maker is: Kevlaur

    This is not their "Bug Buster" cedar mulch, just the run of the mill stuff, it does have a cedar scent though.

    Better yet, I've just emailed them to see what their production process is. They may say it's all confidential but hopefully they'll respond in some fashion as to what may or may not be washed over the stuff as it's being bagged. I'll let you all in on what they say as I told them I'd be using it as a part of soil mixes for exotic plants because it was "such a nicely prepared product" (gotta kiss a little a sometimes!).

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    N=R* fs fp ne fl fi fc L Pyro's Avatar
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    IIRC PingMan uses cedar mulch in the bottom of all his pots as a drainage layer and to prevent the formation of anaerobic conditions that lead to that funky sulfer smell. Something in the cedar has antimicrobial properties.

    All told I'd say give it a run on a test plant, something expendable and see how it goes. That is how I discovered that pine bark mulch is a good media.
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    We've been using Cypress Mulch, the brand is Corbitt "No Float" (contains no chemicals, no pressure treated scrap wood). We buy it at Lowes in the garden department with all the other mulch. Boy, is it less expensive than orchid bark, and it doesn't break down. We've been using it for a few years now, and the Neps really love it.
    We mix the cypress mulch with sponge rock (puffed perlite), long fiber sphagnum moss, pumice, aliflor, coco chips, and for certain plants we use peat moss too. It seems our mix is a little different every batch we make, but making mix is like cooking. Like a chef, I cook up those Neps a fine mix!

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Trent @ April 06 2006,7:39)]It seems our mix is a little different every batch we make, but making mix is like cooking. Like a chef, I cook up those Neps a fine mix!
    I would deffinately try a few expendable plants first. The plants may not like the aromatic oils in the cedar wood. Let me know how you make out. The cedar should be fairly resistant to decomposition.

    I am going to see if they have the cypress mulch at our Lowes. I am always looking for material that has the properties I need and cost the least! Every batch is indeed a little different Trent lol!

    Tony
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

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