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Thread: new nep

  1. #9

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    Cuban treefrogs love to hide in Nepenthes pitchers.
    I am just guessing, but I would think the frog excrement would be beneficial to the plant. Many have thought the uppers of N. lowii evolved for birds to go in.

    Cheers,

    Joe

  2. #10

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    its an hybrid? well what is it an hybrid of?

  3. #11

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    and what conditions should it be in? its rather big so i put it outside and hanged it i water it every day with distilled water cause its kinda hard to use the tray method in mid air

  4. #12

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    It's believed to be (northiana x maxima) x maxima. Nobody is 100% sure. This hybrid comes from the DeRoose Nureries in Holland.

    Cheers,

    Joe

  5. #13

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    Miranda is produced by a commercial tissue culture company in Florida called DeRoose. They originated in the Netherlands. They produce a few unidentifiable hybrids ('gentle', 'velvet', 'Miranda'...) and, unfortunately, have no idea of the parentage. Some experts in the field, including Harry Luther from Selby Gardens in Sarasota, figure the plant is Mixta Superba. Others feel it is (mixta x maxima). Nobody knows for sure. One of the drawbacks of the DeRoose plants is that they cut the vines back before shipping, probably to root them for new plants. This doesn't hurt the plant...they're usually loaded with pitchers...but when the current pitchers on the plant wither away, the owner is usually left with a green plant and no pitchers. Hang onto the plant and keep caring for it. When the new growth matures you'll get more pitchers.

    Easy to grow. Keep it moist, but not soggy. Don't let it dry out. Filtered sunlight. Bring it indoors, or into a greenhouse, in the winter to protect it from frost. Until you've grown a few nepenthes and get more familiar with them, don't fertilize. Good luck. Let us know how it goes. Oz

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