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Thread: PHOTO Nepenthes ILLNESS!!!

  1. #1
    MrAga73's Avatar
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    Talking

    Hello Carnivorous world!
    I need this time your help!
    I have already an idea...but not all is totally clear to me.
    So...I went on holidays for 18 days and when I returned I realized that the dead had blow over my poor plants!

    3 Dead plants : 1 villosa , 1 Inermis Clone B and a Tentaculata.
    I will keep those plants outside and I will act as they would be alive because I believe that only the arial plant is dead....maybe the roots are quite alive. I will tell you.

    Now let's come to the point :
    ITALY had a very HOT summer this year...african anticiclon brough really record temperatures in Italy near to 40 celcius!
    So now I have some plants that are more weak and has been attacked by some fungi...at least I think this.Since this is my first time with so many problems I post you the photos:

    Here my truncata highland ( I had the same problem last year but more more worse and I just gave here better growing conditions with lower temperatures and I used on it an insecticide acaricide.Just this...nothing for FUNGI.The plant gave me good reactions but for 9 months I had premature opening pitchers.By the way ( the plant gave me a very little deformed pitcher of 3 cm after a very big one of 23...)
    This is now actual condition:







    This is my actual situation of my lowland truncata in terrarium :





    My sanguinea that is indoor behind a window with morning sunlight.In this case only the leafes in direct touch of the sun rays were so brown. But is also a fungi the upper part of the plant?





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  2. #2
    MrAga73's Avatar
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    Now Inermis ( the one bigger and clone A of Wistuba ).In this case the plant has only regreated with more little leafes and a black point on the top :



    Now truncata x khasiana who is really big of spots...:





    and this plants I think that infected also the 2 meters and 20 cm copelandii x hybrid! The spots are similiar over the entire plant:



    Now dear friends :
    Which tips and help could you give me?
    I have this following question :

    1) if weather becomes cooler and more agreable for the plants ...could they become alone stronger and put KO the fungi that attacked them in those weak conditions?

    2) is mine really fungi?Or something else( moschito bites and so on...?)

    3) Is Bayer FUNGICIDE "Proclaim" good to use agains this big problems? Anyone has experiences with an european fungicide?

    Thanks really much to all who will answer,even to give me more streng and courage!

    Mr_Aga
    Milan - ITALY
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  3. #3
    Always a newbie glider14's Avatar
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    wow. sorry to hear about this. the only thing i can think of it might be is some type of pest. have you tried spraying? i have no experience in fungus, bacteria, or viruses. its only been Mites and scale. those markings look nothing like the damage done to my neps by the pests. the N. Sanguinea looks like its been burned.
    Alex

    PS. good luck!
    Everything is explainable. The seemingly unexplainable is but a result of our insufficient knowledge.- Hans Brewer

  4. #4
    War. War never changes. Est's Avatar
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    Most everything there loos like things I've seen on plants that've gotten too much sun.

    The spots, the specks, the browning, the deformed growth- all of it I've seen as a result of being in the sun too long. Not much of a Nep expert, but it looks like regular burn damage to me. Anyone else?

    If it's just burn damage, then all you can do is do your best to nurse them back to health.
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    MrAga73's Avatar
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    Lightbulb

    Est,
    no...I don't think that it is sun burn! Cannot be...because first I have only direct morning sun from day start untill 11:00 - 12:00 a.m.
    Second : even truncata lowland who is in terraium always in the same conditions ( exept more temperature ) has beginning to have those spots.
    So...finally ...too much sun is the wrong solution.
    Glider14,
    I have just begun today to spray on some plants ( copelandii + truncata x khasiana ) some fungicide and some insecticides acarius. I will only know in future how the plants will react.

    Anyway...I think that lower temperatures that have just begun in those last days will give a good contribute...so let's hope that autunn will arrive as soon as possibile.
    Now we have in Milan more fresh temperatures : 18 night and 28 days.
    When I was on holiday the plants had 32 in night and 38 during day with 80% humidity...still too hot for intermediate and highlander Nepenthes.
    Any tips?

    Mr_Aga
    Milan - Italy
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  6. #6
    War. War never changes. Est's Avatar
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    Well, sun damage is twofold. There's the UV portion, and the damage that comes with the high heat you've been having. The high heat can lead to shock, deformation, dessication, insipient wilting, non-insipient wilting.

    From the pictures alone, I'd be most worried about the copelandii hybrid. Looks like the farthest from plain sun damage of all of the plants shown.

    No matter what it is, good luck getting it sorted out! I hope you can do so without any more losses.
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  7. #7
    SpyCspider's Avatar
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    actually, my truncata's been growing inside a terrarium underneath 2 40 watt cool white fluorescents and one of the leaves also developed those spots...new leaves are not however.

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    Dear friend Mr. Aga
    I can only tell you - once more - don't grow the highlanders if you cannot provide the proper conditions. You know my 3 N. lowii, they looked so good this winter; well, as I expected, now (yeah, here in Italy we had a few weeks with 32-35 celsius day and night) they look more or less like your plants. I'll give them away at the next italian meeting. You can't spend your life running behind plants that will take any kind of fungus or parasite because the conditions are wrong. They'll never be happy. And you either. And the parasites/fungi are not the real problem, you know. There's no product that can help you about that.

    Now, coming to your plants at the moment: I see leaf burn in the sanguinea, mites (in italian "acari") in maybe all of them (all the orange spots, but not the little roundish and regular ones, I mean the others - in italian "non i puntini, le macchie!") and what you call fungus is probably rust (in italian "ruggine"). This last one - actually yes, it's a fungus - also appeared on my albomarginata a few years ago, during an incredibly hot summer. A simple fungicide, given just once, and as soon as the weather became cooler the new leaves were fine. This winter your survivors will probably recover. But just wait next year...

    But yet, these problems are not THE PROBLEM. Start with all the wonderful lowlanders the market can offer you. Often people ignore beautiful easy ones like reinwardtiana, bellii, insignis, neoguineensis, tomoriana etc...
    Marcello

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