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Thread: N. mirabilis question

  1. #1

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    Any thoughts?


  2. #2
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    Thought one: That's one big ol' picture!

    Does not look like what I remember as a typical mirabalis, but then it also look like this pitcher is getting on in it's life.
    17 Nash Rd.
    North Salem, NY 10560

    YOU! Outta my gene pool!

  3. #3

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    Hi,
    Sorry the plant is a typical N. mirablis. Petiole leaves with filimate leaf margins.
    Truly,
    Tom

  4. #4

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    Thanks for the ID. Does anyone know what seperates miabilis from smilesii?

  5. #5

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    Hi,
    I looked up some info on the two species and if I spell it right fimbriate not filimate this should give you some idea of what to look for.
    N. mirabilis has longitudinal nerves with the margin of the lower leaves fimbriate in general. Low altitude grower.
    N. smilesii grows at highland altitude and in latin planta brevis erecta non scandens, caulis brevis, sessilia, in currhum- Macfarlane or from Hemsley
    parva acaulescens vel saltem ramulis floriferis, puberulis which if I translate it correctly a short stemless multishoot plant with puberulis decurrent leaves and short tendrils.
    You can find alot of info at Nepenthesofthailand.com and Neofarmthailand.com.
    I find that the plant N. smilesii has very fine hairs on the leaves and edges where N. mirabilis has this fimbriate leaf edge.
    Truly,
    Tom

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