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Thread: N. northiana soil question

  1. #9
    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    I've seend both N. northiana and N. campanulata on multiple occasions in a typical acid medium. i think you are stressing too much on the alkalinity of the mix. If you do decide to add some sort of buffer, do so only in extremely small amounts. One N. northiana I've seen (larger specimen) was in a typical peat/perlite/bark, charcoal mix, and N. campanulata I've seen in pure sphagnum, and typical nepenthes mixes. Marriane North (the painter) did not name the plant, I believe Sir Harry Veitch named it after her, and he had nothing to do with its fondness for the limestone cliff-faces for which it has been noted to grow upon, also note there are specimens that do not grow on the typical habitat, some have been noted to grow upon the ground in leaf litter.

  2. #10

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    Must agree with Nep G. After years of struggling with N. northiana, we repotted from a peaty mix to a very open gritty mix and saw immediate improvement in the growth. The plants were repotted late April-early May and have more than doubled in size. Ph does not appear to be the problem, but proper drainage is essential. Our mix for northiana is a gritty mix including Corbitt No Float Cypress mulch, Grade 3 Sponge Rock, perlite, pumice, and a small amound of ground up sphagnum moss. Also, give them plenty of room. They send out large root systems. This is because in their native habitat the roots cling to the detritus and moss in the crevices of the limestone, and send down a big main tap root that clings to the rock. Rain is frequent, and water almost flash floods around the plants as it pours down the slopes and crevasses of the Bau limestone hills. The water has very little time to pick up dissolved lime, but will sweep the tannins from the surrounding moss/decayed vegetation. This water is most likely slightly on the acid side, and will soak down into the spongy growing surface. It also dissolves the limestone over time and creates dangerous pot holes that are common to the Bau area (just like the Florida Everglades). For us, northiana is doing best in a very slightly acidic condition, and displays a dislike for extremes of ph.

  3. #11

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    Thanks a lot Nep G and Trent, I will keep it in the medium it is in now. Though the plant wasn't very expensive, I don't want to risk anything, as I have wanted a northiana since I first got into CPs
    Z polski y dumny
    Prayer - how to do nothing and still think you're helping.
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  4. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Marriane North (the painter) did not name the plant, I believe Sir Harry Veitch named it after her
    Just a brief note, it's actually against the rules to name a species after yourself, which is part of what makes it such an honor: you've been considered so important in that field that you get a species named after you by someone else, who could name it after anything or anyone they want, but chose you.

    Mokele
    \"With malleus aforethought, mammals got an earful of their ancestor's jaw.\"
    --J. Burns, on the evolution of auditory ossicles.

  5. #13

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    I never said she named the species...she was a painter, I know it was named FOR her, not by her.

    Can't you name hybrids after yourself though?
    Z polski y dumny
    Prayer - how to do nothing and still think you're helping.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5F5aCUNE4Z8
    ^^^Newest vid

  6. #14
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    Just wanted to put in my two cents here on the campanulata that Nep G. mentioned.

    Mine is growing very successfully in LFS & orchid mix (about 70/30 mix). However, looks like I need to repot my northiana! I didn't know they needed a big pot - must have overlooked that on in my research on the speices. Oops.
    17 Nash Rd.
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    YOU! Outta my gene pool!

  7. #15
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    You can't name a species after yourself? That's stupid. If I ever discovered something you bet I'd call it parsonsii!... after.. my father...named Ted Parsons... who shares my last name

  8. #16

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    Hi,
    While I believe it's considered to be bad manners to name a plant after yourself I don't think it's actually forbidden.
    Cheers,
    T.

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