User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 8 of 12

Thread: How cool is too cool for lowland/

  1. #1
    Somewhat Unstable superimposedhope's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Where the Slime Live; Where the Slime Breed
    Posts
    1,697
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Ok,
    So I know this has surely been asked many a times; and once upon a time I did know but it has been a while since I had any interest.
    Due to getting tired of trying to maintaine a chamber, I all together gave up on Neps but here I am now with a gh finally.

    I want to know which could do well for me in a gh that is gonna drop to mid 50'sF. at night and highs in the possible 80'sF. during winter. The relative hum. is 70% or better. Light is pretty good; sits in full sun but light is spread through 10Mil splastic - very bright indirect. I'm thinking probably lowlands but want a little reassurance as it's been a while since I knew anything about 'em.

    Thanks guys,
    Joe
    \"There is nothing here of interest to any nation, as a matter of fact there is nothing here but humans!\"

  2. #2
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Metro Atlanta Area
    Posts
    9,681
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I don't like to let my LL's get below 70. Some of them can probably take it.

    JB_Orchidguy grows lowlands in his greenhouse in N. ga. Maybe he'll chime in.

  3. #3
    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Alexandria Bay, NY Z-5a
    Posts
    6,341
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The big deal with lowlanders is that they must have hot hot days. They can take it down to 55-60F at night but the day time temps should be in the 90's if that is the scenario. LL Nepenthes do the highest amount of photosynthesis in the day and it is especially important for the temperatures to be high to speed this process up, thus giving the plant a growing range.

  4. #4
    MrAga73's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    ITALY - Milan
    Posts
    400
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Nice question,
    but it depends for me also how difference of temperatures there are between night and day.
    In my terrarium even lowlanders like truncata and campanulata have no problems to have 15 celsius in the night if about 24 during day occurs.
    For my point of view the tollerance also depends of the delta temperature bettween night and day. Of course of temperatures drops too low and remains dropped for long ( weeks ) the plants suffers and does stop to grow.
    Example...my ex rafflesiana do never grow with temperatures under 19 Degree...incredible but true!
    Mr_Aga
    Milan - ITALY
    ******************************
    Mr_Aga
    Icq : 18240372
    http://www.piantecarnivore.org
    ******************************

  5. #5
    Cardiac Nurse JB_OrchidGuy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    SC
    Posts
    3,818
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Last winter I had a lowland Truncata ans a sanguina in my GH and I let the temps get down to 55 60 before the heaters would come on. Occasional it would get down to 50 if the night was cold enough. They both did great over the winter. In fact I think that is when I had the most pitchers on the truncata. I recieved alot of my nepenthes this summer so I am banking on them being able to take those temps too. So far this GH seems a little better at keeping the heat, but I still have the thermastat set to 60. I have some low and highlands and so far everything is growing fine. I hope it stays that way. I have my exhaust fan set to come on at 80 just because I don;t want it to get too hot and then not be able to keep up during the summer. I probably could raise it and I think I will raise it to 85 tomorrow. I just do not want to keep it too warm for the highlanders I have in there too.

    I know what some people are thinking. I am nuts for keeping highs and lows together, but hey its working so far. I will be trying to talk the wife into letting me build a highland chamber, but I am not holding m breath yet.
    JB
    Friend me on facebook with JB_orchidguy@yahoo.com.
    Growlist Updated 05/08/13

  6. #6
    Always a newbie glider14's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Louisville, Kentucky
    Posts
    3,956
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]I know what some people are thinking. I am nuts for keeping highs and lows together, but hey its working so far. I will be trying to talk the wife into letting me build a highland chamber, but I am not holding m breath yet.
    take a look at elgecko! he grows Hamata and a Raff on the same windowsil!
    Everything is explainable. The seemingly unexplainable is but a result of our insufficient knowledge.- Hans Brewer

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Central Coast, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    792
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi JBorchidguy:

    Truncata is very much tolerant to hot and cold weather, even though the original form comes from low altitudes.
    N. sanguinea is a highland which loves warm temperatures too.
    So both examples, as i have mentioned in the past, are not typical lowlander and highlander respectively thus, more resistant to suboptimal conditions.

    N. bicalcarata, N. ampullaria, N. northiana, and N albomarginata (black, green, purple, forms) are more like the typical lowlanders and i would not grow these in cold weather at all.

    Gus

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    1,163
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Like Gracilis said, our greenhouse will get lows down to 50F and our bicals, amps, merrillianas, northianas, albos, raffs, echinostomas, sumatrana show no ill effects because the days are close to 90 F with 70+ % humidity. This does not happen every night during winter-only when a strong cold front passes thru south Florida. Typical winter nights are in the 55-63 F range, with mid day highs around 90F. Our intermediate-highlanders love it!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •