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Thread: anyone have experience propagating N. globosa?

  1. #1

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    Since this is a rhyzomatous species, does normal propagation by cutting work? Would snapping a piece of the rhyzome off work, as it does in other CP genera? I have a rather "extreme" form of this spp that I would like to propagate to see if it retains certain growth characteristics, and if so, i would attempt to register it as a cultivar. (actually, even if it doesn't, I've never seen another globosa with this type of coloration, so I will probably try anyway)
    Z polski y dumny
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    Tip cuttings work, and so do rhizome divisions. We have noticed that small rhizome divisions will take some time to grow out and produce pitchers that are up to par. In other words, like most Neps, they produce their best pitchers on an established, grown out plant.

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    so do you just snap a piece of the rhizome off and pot it up? How big does it need to be?

    And by tip cuttings, do you mean the growth tip, or a normal cutting (through the stem)? If you mean a tip cutting: 1) do stem cuttings not work?, and
    2) how do you take a cutting of the tip
    Z polski y dumny
    Prayer - how to do nothing and still think you're helping.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5F5aCUNE4Z8
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    Rhizome cuttings work with even a small piece, as small as half an inch, but it will take time for it get up to speed. By tip cutting, I am referring to the top top three leaves of the vine. You're making a regular cutting of the active growth tip of the vine. By only taking the top part of the vine, you will spur more ground shoots and very likely a node on the remaining part of the vine will become active, and start a new growth point. Vikings are very good about this. Once that new growth point produces a few leaves, make another cutting. We find the growth point type cuttings(tip cuttings) strike much quicker than the older part of the vine.
    Hope this makes sense.
    T.

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    Always a newbie glider14's Avatar
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    what does this extreme form look like?
    Everything is explainable. The seemingly unexplainable is but a result of our insufficient knowledge.- Hans Brewer

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    Thanks a lot Trent, I will give it a try and see how it turns out!

    Glider:
    It is a very young plant...probably only 2 years. Not only does it have about 5 growth points (even though it has never been cut) , but the stem actually bifurcates in a semi-symmetric pattern to give its current growth form. This I have never seen before. On top of that, the pitchers are an intense yellow, with a red peristome and extremely red wings. I have seen that coloration before a very few number of times, but never have I seen that coloration, coupled with almost entirely red leaves and stem
    Z polski y dumny
    Prayer - how to do nothing and still think you're helping.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5F5aCUNE4Z8
    ^^^Newest vid

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