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Thread: nepenthes ventricosa in the vivarium

  1. #9
    noobie!!! LOL
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    Whoa

    I'm not sure I want the tads to be raised in the pitchers! LOL!
    I will have azureus in there, which are biiger darts, getting around 2". As for the heat, it will be around 75-85 during the day,a nd 70s at night. What are the lighting requirements for this, as well as substrate? Thanks alot!-Adam Hoyt

  2. #10
    白人看不懂 Drosera36's Avatar
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    Those are rather warm temperatures, so probably most highlanders won't do well, although also most highlanders are rather large.

    They appreciate a light, airy mix that gets flushed often. I just usually put some of this and that in there, but usually my mixes include some of the following:

    Orchid bark
    Peat
    LFS (long fiber sphagnum (moss))
    Horticultural charcoal chips (don't use very much)
    Perlite (If I have it)

    The stuff that makes up the bulk of the soil is the LFS and the orchid bark and if I have it, perlite. The peat is just to hold the stuff together, and it helps to hold onto a little more water. The charcoal is mostly just for drainage and it makes me feel like I'm doing more work. So maybe like 2 parts LFS, 1 part orchid bark, 1/2 part peat, 1/8 part charcoal (as in like a large pinch for a 5 inch pot), 1 part perlite.

    I'm not sure how your setup is, but I figure it would probably be best to have the Nep in a pot hidden in some moss or substrate, just to make it easier to take care of, and also, if the vivarium is not too small, you can take it out to water. Although, if you plan on just letting it grow wild in the vivarium, leave out the charcoal part, because it can apparently break down and get funky nasty. They like to be moist, not soaking. I tend to water whenever the top of the soil is crisp, then I pour lots of water over the pot, so that it gets lots of water. Although a humid vivarium wouldn't require frequent watering.

    Neps tend to like bright light, and if we're going with fluorecents here, maybe around 80 or so watts, but that would be just if the plant is around 5 inches underneath, so more would be required if they are lower down.

    -Ben
    Last edited by Drosera36; 05-01-2007 at 02:06 PM. Reason: changed the ingredients and stuff, heh and OCD
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  3. #11
    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
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    Yeah, that's warm for highlanders for the most part... You certainly won't be growing a villosa in there. N. ventricosa could probably hack it, as that's a pretty adaptable species, but you'll want to look for lowlanders or plants that can grow in intermediate condtions if you decide to add something else to the tank in question. Try http://www.nepenthesaroundthehouse.com/ for descriptions of individual species; if I were to guess, I'd say anything with a home range above 1500m minimum elevation is probably not going to work for you, or grow kind of slow at best.
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    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    I've grown N. ventricosa in ultra lowland conditions just fine. Go for it if you aren't afraid for your frogs.

    N. bellii is very small. It's the smallest.

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    Personally I would not mix very tiny frogs with neps. I know it sounds like a cool-looking tank to have neps and frogs in it...but...I wouldn't take the risk.
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  6. #14
    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JustLikeAPill View Post
    I've grown N. ventricosa in ultra lowland conditions just fine. Go for it if you aren't afraid for your frogs.

    N. bellii is very small. It's the smallest.
    Yeah, N. bellii really is the perfect size for this application... they're nice and compact and the pitchers are naturally tiny. Your Dendros will look like cane toads next to an N. bellii. Er, colorful shiny smooth-skinned cane toads.
    ~Joe
    o//~ Livin' like a bug ain't easy / My old clothes don't seem to fit me /
    I got little tiny bug feet / I don't really know what bugs eat /
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    Livin' like a bug ain't easy / Livin' like a bug ain't easy... o//~

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