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Thread: lots of questions

  1. #9
    Nepenthusiast's Avatar
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    Ahhh so many questions! Please, we have a good search function!

    Try reading The Savage Garden by Peter D'Amato or nepenthesaroundthehouse.com.

  2. #10
    Moderator
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    two words: Search Feature

    If you do a little more research first, you will a) answer some of your more basic questions and b) be able to ask more direct, you-specific question.
    17 Nash Rd.
    North Salem, NY 10560

    YOU! Outta my gene pool!

  3. #11
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Neps are notorious fore reacting to significant changes in their environment - temp, humidity. So I would suggest that it is a temporary reaction - like a few weeks and need time to acclimate.

  4. #12
    James
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    about how long will this take?

  5. #13
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    A few weeks to a year.

  6. #14
    James
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    Wow! does the time it takes depend on the type of nepenthes?

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    It seems like it depends on a multitude of factors. But to answer your question, yes, some species are quicker to adapt than others. Also, the conditions you are able to provide it would make certain species adapt quicker than others. It seems like the average humidity in Melbourne, Australia should be high enough for Nepenthes, and some of the best temps for Highlanders (at least according to a weather tracker website). This of course depends on where exactly you're located, and how close you are to a large body of water... and of course windcover. Ventricosas are known to be good beginner neps and very hardy, so your nep should bounce back fairly quickly. I noticed you said you keep it near your pond, so this added humidity should definitely help. If you have a fountain or waterfall in your pond, the splashing should help increase humidity some too. You also said it was a fast growing plant when you transplanted it, and generally speaking, larger nepenthes have more problems with transplant shock than smaller ones. If I were you, I would stop foliar fertilizing altogether, and let your plant adjust. It seems like it has enough nutrients stored up to create a pitcher once it needs to. Once it does this, it will attract many different types of insects:flies, bees, gnats, and possibly even a colony of ants. I even had one move into my truncata orchid potting bark (The ants create a symbiotic relationship with nepenthes by drowning a few members and eating the nectar... I even saw them standing on top of the floating dead ants to lick the sides of the pitcher). The digestive fluid contains enzymes and bacteria which help to break down the insects drowned inside. When a new pitcher opens, it seems as though there is some fluid already in there, but mine will start to dry up, so I just replace it with distilled water. I figure this is completely natural, seeing as how they receive much rainfall which undoubtedly overflows their pitchers from time to time. Make sure to put distilled or RO (reverse osmosis) water into the pitchers however, as this most closely matches rainwater, and normal tap water may or may not be suitable (depending on your local water source). I am not sure what the minimum humidity necessary for pitcher formation is, but I have seen a few posts around here with people having success at 50+%. So long as the filtered light isn't too dim, then the lighting should be fine as well. As far as flowering time and upper pitcher formation goes, I am still learning about that (It seems like it can take up to many years, dependent of course on how large the plant is to begin with). Then again aren't we all still learning? Good Luck and happy growing.

    -Daniel

    P.S. It should all bounce back and be healthy pretty soon, but get some close-up pictures so everyone can give you some better advice. Maybe take a pic of the pond with the plant in the pic and which direction is North/E/S/W. This way you can determine which area across the sky the sun's path takes up, and at which times in the day the plant would receive optimum lighting.

  8. #16
    James
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    Thanks. that information is very useful.

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