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Thread: Highland on lowland conditions?

  1. #1
    Do you like that... MrFus's Avatar
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    Highland on lowland conditions?

    Is there some one that have a highland plant growing on lowland conditions?

    How is the plant doing?

    I ask this just for curiosity, I have read a lot of the average temperatures that the Lowland showld have and the percent of humidity they need to grow, how the highland will respond to heat index? its posible to aclimate the plant to grow fine or the plant will be on pain and grow weak and sad?

    N. Albomarginata, N. Ampullaria
    N. Bellii, N. Bicalcarata, N. Rafflesiana
    N. Sanguinea (Orange Pitcher), Cephalotus Follicularis
    .

    http://www.knology.net/~fus

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    Carnivorous plant enthusiast vraev's Avatar
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    I would suppose that even easy species wouldn't really be too happy about prolonged life in those conditions. ultra highland...I am pretty sure u can forget about them...they need their constant conditions. Easy highlanders can take intermediate...but I am not sure of pure lowlander conditions.

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    I grow highlanders in lowland conditions. They survive and look decent until winter, and then they take off. Some species (tobaica, etc) and some hybrids (alata giant x spectabilis, etc) actually do really well year round. It just depends on the plant and how high the humdity is. Lots of growers in Hawaii grow highlanders outside in LL conditions, but they have about 90% humidity to buffer the temperatures.

    I've kept some highlanders at about 85 for upwards of six months on two separate occasions in the last two years, Hawaiian growers have done the same for longer, so unless you have a weak clone or you don't water enough/your humidity isn't high enough/etc, you don't need to worry about them "not surviving in the long term".
    Z polski y dumny
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    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
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    Supposedly a few highlanders can tolerate some aspects of lowland conditions; N. alata is reportedly able to grow well with little nighttime drop in temperatures.
    ~Joe
    o//~ Livin' like a bug ain't easy / My old clothes don't seem to fit me /
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    Carnivorous plant enthusiast vraev's Avatar
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    but would it be growing at the same vigor and level as it would in its true highland conditions?

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    All of mine grow fine with more or less the same speed. Some are actually a little faster. As to vigor, they look at least decent and never succumb to any infections or pests or anything. I had what i think was a caterpillar practically destory an argentii, and its making a recovery.
    Z polski y dumny
    Prayer - how to do nothing and still think you're helping.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5F5aCUNE4Z8
    ^^^Newest vid

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    N.alata, like N.khasiana, grow well in lowland conditions. They don't really count as highlanders to me.

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    If you consider ventrata as a highlander, then yes. The one in the tank is by far the best of the ventratas with several pitchers. It is battling for space with a rafflesiana and bicalcarata

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