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Thread: How tolerant is N. spectabilis and the highland form of N. truncata?

  1. #1
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    How tolerant is N. spectabilis and the highland form of N. truncata?

    Hi guys. I'm going to splurge since my Bday is coming up, so I thought I'd buy myself something (things... ) pretty. I've got my list all made up, but before I order I wanted to check with the more experienced crowd. I'm really confident with lowlanders, but I'm relatively new to highlanders you see. I grow in the basement, and during the hot Georgia summers, the night temperature is 70 degrees on the dot reliably. The day temperatures usually hover between 75 and 78, but at the end of the day the maximum high is 80 degrees on the dot reliably. During the winter, the low is probably 50 or 55 at night, and I haven't grown in the basement long enough to know what the daytime temps will be, but I'll guess mid 70's. 50 or 55 are estimates based on what I feel when I've been down there in the winter, I haven't grown long enough in the basement to measure it. 60 degrees at LEAST but I'm strongly betting 50 or 55. If it's too cool during the day, I'll add a heater easily (but I'm going on a tangent...).

    ANYWAY. I've got great light, humidity, and air circulation. Temps sound OK? I know it's not optimum but if it can take it during the summer and not suffer so bad as to not rebound in the fall, I'll forgo this plant and buy something else. I feel like such a newb


    The N. spectabilis is the North Sumatran clone if that matters.

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    Always a newbie glider14's Avatar
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    my truncata HL is slow... but very eays and should do well in many different environments. its supposedly easier than the lowland form. cant comment on spectabilis though...
    Alex
    Everything is explainable. The seemingly unexplainable is but a result of our insufficient knowledge.- Hans Brewer

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    Moderator Cindy's Avatar
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    JLAP,

    N. truncata Pasian, which is the highland form, grows well here in lowland conditions of high 80s in the day and mid 80s for the night.

    I am not sure about N. spectabilis though 'cos no one has grown one here as yet.
    Cindy

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    Both forms of truncata grow with relatively the same vigor in all conditions.
    I had 2x spectabilis which were exposed to a constant 80-88 degrees (usually about 85) for about 5 months. They both grew in very low humidity. They did "well" for a while, pitchering, etc, but eventually the heat took its toll at about the 5 or 6 month mark, and the leaves started getting smaller and smaller, so I had to trade them away.
    Z polski y dumny
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    endparenthesis's Avatar
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    My HL truncata doesn't care what its conditions are. It grows everywhere.

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    I, as you know, have not been growing all that long... However, it sounds like your temperatures are much better than mine, and all my highlanders did just fine in the blazing summer heat (high 90s) where I grow in a regular room, which doesn't have the advantage of a basement. I also think that it is optimal that you are buying the neps before winter hits, so your highlanders can thrive now, and then slowly acclimate to the summer heating of next year. You can always look into getting an aquarium chiller and throw it in the water under your eggcrate, if it looks dismal, but I would think you will be fine. I have not grown a highland truncata before, but both of my Spectabilis did fine in the heat. My lowland truncata did fine in colder temperatures, so overall I would assume it is a very hardy species. Again though, I don't have the greatest experience, so take my advice accordingly. Oh yeah, for reference, my Rajah didn't exactly thrive in the summer, but it put out new leaves faithfully and is picking up speed as winter approaches. Good luck! Oh yea, when is your Bday clint?
    - Daniel

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    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    Aquarium chillers are very expensive lmao.



    By Bday is Saturday. I'll be a legal adult I'm very happy about that lol.

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    JLAP,

    There's nuthin' legal about you!

    I will echo the sentiments on the truncata - however I had a tough time with my spectabalis during the summer heat wave two years ago. It was NOT happy. It lived, but it STILL recovering, over a year later.
    17 Nash Rd.
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    YOU! Outta my gene pool!

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