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Thread: Pot size: Does it matter?

  1. #17

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    I think it depends on the plant. You don't need to put an N. argentii in a 5 gallon pot. But an N. bicalcarata could eventually end up in a 20 gallon pot. But again you would not want to start an N. bicalcarata in a 20 gallon pot. Again, depends on plant, species, and speed of growth to determine size of pot to start with/time to repot. JMO.

  2. #18

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    5 gallon for argentii? No. However, I recommend potting in something about 2-3x the width of the plant for argentii so it can anchor its tendrils in the soil.
    Z polski y dumny
    Prayer - how to do nothing and still think you're helping.
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  3. #19
    Do you like that... MrFus's Avatar
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    Most of the plants show a proportion between the size of the root sistem and the rest of the plant...

    If I understand, the "carnivorus plants" rely on the media primarily for support and water and as a diference of many other members of the Plantae family they use the traps and digestive enzymes to obtain nitrogen, phosphorus and other crucial elemental nutrients.

    So based on this I figure the root sistem will be more small on proportion with the foliage... or just the distribution will be diferent as a deep root sistem or a more wide root sistem, which one is the case for the nepenthes?

    N. Albomarginata, N. Ampullaria
    N. Bellii, N. Bicalcarata, N. Rafflesiana
    N. Sanguinea (Orange Pitcher), Cephalotus Follicularis
    .

    http://www.knology.net/~fus

  4. #20

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    Some neps can get pretty large and not have too much root mass (especially if you keep the soil pretty moist). Others however, can have a giant root system in relation to plant size (bical/viking).

    Some plants have different structures too. Truncata roots tend to go pretty straight down, but rajah roots grow more laterally.
    Z polski y dumny
    Prayer - how to do nothing and still think you're helping.
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  5. #21
    Do you like that... MrFus's Avatar
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    I understand, external factors (moisture, kind of media, airation, stress, etc) and the genetics of the plant determinate the root type and size...

    So I will say: the only way to know how big the new pot for a nepenthes need to be is after repot 2 or 3 times the plant, on that way we should know how our plants root sistem is and wich one will be the perfect size for the next change...

    N. Albomarginata, N. Ampullaria
    N. Bellii, N. Bicalcarata, N. Rafflesiana
    N. Sanguinea (Orange Pitcher), Cephalotus Follicularis
    .

    http://www.knology.net/~fus

  6. #22
    Lover of Mountains nightsky's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the replies. So it sounds like the answer is: "It depends."

  7. #23
    Cardiac Nurse JB_OrchidGuy's Avatar
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    Such is life. It all does depend.

    I personally use a 12" pot for most things. I am not good at repotting every year unless the plant is on a decline or obviously has outgrown the pot. Peat is decomposed LFS anyway. If the plant looks fine I leave it alone. If it is on a decline then I check the roots. That is me. That is the way I grow. So whatever works for you. You must also keep in mind I grow in a GH with plenty of room. So a 12 inch hanging pot is no biggie for me. Of course I have a lot of smaller plants in smaller pots on the bench. I seamed to forget about those when I did my first post. I just don't believe in restricting the plant to a certain size pot. Now when I grow in a grow room in 09 I may be singing a different tune.

    The bottom line is you need to learn to listen to the cues set off by your plant and act accordingly.
    JB
    Friend me on facebook with JB_orchidguy@yahoo.com.
    Growlist Updated 05/08/13

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