User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 6 of 11 FirstFirst ... 2345678910 ... LastLast
Results 41 to 48 of 83

Thread: Nepenthes rajah

  1. #41
    Carnivorous plant enthusiast vraev's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,806
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    lol nepfreak!!! 3 min diff I guess ;p lol! I want to get some of those wooden baskets as well. Av8tor1 was giving me advice about cypress bark, tree fern fiber as well. I will be checking that out soon.

    @ capensis,

    that plant is a really adaptive plant. I had my ventrata for 1 year in a mix of plain peat moss. yeah.....your mix sounds fine for it. You just have to be careful when you go on to the specialist species where you need to consider better mixes.

  2. #42

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    California
    Posts
    620
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    PK- Sorry, I just got home from work and didn't have a chance to log on till now. WOW..this thread really took off. My grow mix is primarily cedar/redwood mulch (washed), small orchid bark, medium orchid bark, pumice, perlite in a ratio of: 1,1,1/2,1/4,1/4. If I had charcoal I would add 1/2 part of that as well. Since I started using this mix on all my N. veitchii all I can say is OMG!!!!! What a difference. I grow them pretty dry and humid anyways.

    Like Capslock said, the N. rajah seem to grow faster in the open mix. They certainly do for me. The main reason I am not a supporter of 'potting on' a LFS root ball into a larger pot of LFS is that the root ball of LFS is going to eventually rot away and will smell like ammonia. It IS scary to repot a large rajah...but there will DEFINITELY AND WITHOUT A DOUBT be problems in the long run by using pure LFS.

    That old moss will not last forever and your plant will eventually need to be moved up into larger and larger pots in order to support its growth. How many times do you think you can keep shifting a root ball of LFS into more LFS without the stuff just becomming an anaerobic disaster? (did I spell that correctly? hmm).

    I'm sorry, but sometimes the cure can be worse than the illness. And to answer a previous question...I was really only referring to not repotting Nepenthes rajah when it gets really large, or at least being exceptionally careful when you do.

    Let me tell you briefly, or as briefly as I can, what you can expect by continuing to shift N. rajah into larger and larger pots of LFS or even LFS/bark. You take your root mass from that 12 inch basket (which it has filled entirely) and need to put it into a ohhhh...let's say..a 3 or 4 gallon pot beause you do not want to disturb it for a long time. You decide you do not want to use pure LFS so you opt for an open mix. Smart move. So you leave that large mass of LFS and LFS/bark mixture in tact and just fill in around it with your new, open bark or mulch based mix. BAD MOVE!!!!

    You see, that new open mix will have far more air spaces between the articles, which is good. But it's only this portion of the mix that is going to dry out. The center of the pot..composed primarily of LFS and whatnot will remain moist to wet; all the time. Please do not think that you can just water the outside perimiter of the pot where the mix is dry because that is just a recipe for disaster. Eventually in time the moss will decompose and suddenly you begin to notice that your plant is leaning quite a bit and needs to be staked to hold it up.

    That's not a bad thing until you go to insert the stake and you suddenly notice that your plant is VERY wobbly in the pot and with careful digging with your finger you can see that the mossy root mass in the center of the pot..the part that was connected to the main stem, is disappearing and is no long connected to the stem's main root mass. You can safely diagnose this as root rot. And please do not be fooled into thinking that shifting a large root mass of LFS, with or wthout bark, into a larger pot and filling in and around said LFS with an open mix will provide extra air movement to the moss helping to keep it better, longer. It will not. It will not work. It will not work now nor will it work ever.

    If, unfortunately, you do have to keep potting on into the same moss just to prevent damaging the root mass then we will eventually be hearing your tales of woe. Nepenthes rajah may do well in LFS as a seedling or a juvenile...but it will not do well as an adult. Once it gets to a certain size...let's say near adult like mine..it will become very demanding in its requirements; especially its choice of soil.

    Please understand my stance on this subject is one of proven experience. I'm not shooting off at the hip...or however that goes. I do not need to run simultaneous tests on multiple plants. I know from first hand experience a bit about plant physiology. You can expect that in time...the larger the pot of LFS you grow this species in, the greater your chances will be of losing it. I'm sorry if any of this scares you Varun. That's not my intention. I want more than anything for you to be successful with this species because I know how passionate you are about it. But we need to be realistic here.

    Growing Nepenthes should be treated more like a science than just a hobby. Get every book you can lay your hands on about Nepenthes and/or the flora of Southeast Asia. Study and learn about the locations and habitats these plants come from and take it seriously. This is especially important when dealing with uber rare montane species like rajah. It's a proven fact that some of the harder nep species are not too hard to grow when they're young...but give them time and they can really challenge your horticultural experiences.

    To answer one more question. If I receive a new plant that is growing in pure LFS, should I get it out of the moss right away? Like Capslock said...it depends entirely on the species you're dealing with. The more common species, or even hybrids for that matter, don't mind having their roots messed with as much as rajah does. And yes, I have heard that disturbing northiana and merilliana can have the same effect as well. Unless you're Jeff Shaffer. Now THERE is a master grower if ever there was one.

  3. #43
    Carnivorous plant enthusiast vraev's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,806
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Totally agree Phil. lol! Well....its better to be "scared now" and keep this fact about the media in mind rather than suffer later (which unfortunately you are facing right now!!). I appreciate your valuable input.

    I have personally read almost every single page on nepenthes rajah I can find on the web. Sometimes even those in other languages with translation. I have a collection of over 500 N.rajah pics that I keep to encourage myself on where I want to see my specimen to go.

    A perfect example of this is how horrible my ceph looked when it was growing in a crappy 100% LFS media. It died to the root and then came back. However, Butch & a lot of others here recognised the problem and advised me to repot it into a ligher media. The results are obvious. It seems that most carnivorous plants seem to prefer lighter media with more aeration.

    I will be definitely shugging away from using a lot of lfs in my mixes from now on. I was talking to Butch and have decided that i will be on the lookout for some Cyprus bark, cedar mulch, western fir bark and maybe a higher grade of perlite. As I mentioned...there is only this one professional nursery which has like a table with different mulch samples which I can probably take pictures of and verify before buying. But lol....thanks for the advice. I know a lot of people here especially PK have been adamant about LFS in mixes. Unfortunately, your bad experience seems to be the perfect justification.

    So there you go Phil. You can see my plant in its pot in that pic. What would your suggestion be How long do you think I can go from this point before I should probably think about moving it to a lighter media?? I know that it will set the plant back a lot....but Its better to have it stress a bit than die later on. I feel like I have some time. MY mix tends to be pretty wet as I try to keep the live LFS nice and alive. However....it must be spelling disaster in the root zone. I am guessing maybe summer end might be a good time to think about repotting this baby??

    Thanks,

    Varun

  4. #44

    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Ft. Worth, TX
    Posts
    2,251
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks for the answer Phil. Where can I get pumice? I can't find coarse perlite anywhere, so I think this would be a good substitute.

    I can speak from experience that larger merrilliana does not at all appreciate root disturbance.

    V, maybe Phil will disagree with me, but I'd repot now so it will get over the stress before your temps increase in the summer. Repotting stress plus extra heat may well cause death.
    Z polski y dumny
    Prayer - how to do nothing and still think you're helping.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5F5aCUNE4Z8
    ^^^Newest vid

  5. #45
    Carnivorous plant enthusiast vraev's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,806
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well PK...thats the question. Do I repot soon'ish?? I do have to wait anyways atleast till mid may as I have to move out of res, head home and then buy this stuff first. But it is hard to swallow the bullet considering it took me months for this baby to come around.

    But yeah...I am willing to make the change though. Just don't know that if it is required right now as I prefer to enjoy some nice pitchers on it and most importantly: allow it to regain some of its strength and grow more leaves before I repot it. (Yeah! I am feeding it now ... live crickets)

    I am sure that it will drop all its pitchers when I do repot it as the media won't be sooo water retentive as the current one.

  6. #46
    wasted's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    UK, Hampshire
    Posts
    5
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Evening all, not often you'll see me on this side of the pond.. Hi to all who know me.. good to meet you those who dont..

    Vraev dropped me a line about this topic so I thought i'd chime in..

    I grow in a greenhouse, humidity down to 60% during the day, up to 90% at night, temps down to 6 at night up to 28 day (currently)..

    I grow my rajah in a 14" x 10" hazel basket, its in a light mix of fine orchid bark, perlite, hydroleca, peat and chopped sphag, ive no idea of the ratio, its just feels right.. its probably around 2:1:1:1:1, its topped with live sphag...

    The bottom inch of the basket is a layer of hydroleca, I find water pours straight through my mix and the hydroleca prevents it pooling at the bottom at all.. I water heavily every 4 days, usually the live sphag is starting to dry out a bit by this time...

    The good thing about the hazel basket is that when I come to repot I can stand the entire thing in its new basket, cut away the old one completely and slide away its remains from under the plant.. I then fill around the sides with the same mix as before keeping the plant and its rootball completely encased in its media.

    Here she is, 2 current pitchers and two developing, leaves are now bigger than my hand and starting to elongate so shes getting there..;


    By wasted, shot with u10D,S300D,u300D at 2008-04-16

    Not saying what I do is right, just that it works for me so far..

  7. #47

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    California
    Posts
    620
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by phissionkorps View Post
    V, maybe Phil will disagree with me, but I'd repot now so it will get over the stress before your temps increase in the summer. Repotting stress plus extra heat may well cause death.
    PK, I couldn't agree with you more here. I just feel that Varun needs to be prepared for the possibility, not probability, that repotting at any time may induce some stress. I have found it to be lesser so when the plants are smaller. Just make sure that after repotting you put the plant in a really humid atmosphere for a while to help it adjust.

    PK- Coarse perlite is also called spongerock or spongerok by some distributors. You will have a much better chance getting it online from orchid and/or bromeliad growing supply businesses and such. I know many years ago I used to get mine from Tropiflora in Florida. You may want to give them a holler.

    Wasted- Your plant is beautiful and no one is saying you are doing anything wrong. The purpose here is to give a heads up for making changes for growing larger plants on..undisturbed and making the right choices for growing media.

    One thing I would recommend to everyone here who top dresses with live LFS is to replace it often, no matter how good it looks. It may look really good and fluffy on top, but sometimes if you lift it up off the surface of your pot and smell it it has that ammonia smell developing. Tha's a REALLY bad sign and you should act on it immediately. If it doesn't have that smell then you're in good shape. I know it looks good and all...but I personally would never use it. Neps like to breath even from the top of the soil..although you are growing in baskets so that helps a lot...I'm sure. If you grow in plastic pots..especially 6 inch and larger, and top dress with live sphagnum and it gets all thick and green and beautiful...you're in the process of killing your growing media and creating sludge. There is no air exchange happening if you have a dense carpet of moss choking the surface. You're getting only about 1/8 to 1/4 % use from your mix. LFS really does cause rapid breakdown of bark based mixes. And the worms!!! Don't forget about the worms it atracts to your mix. Don't know how the hell they get there but they do and they LOVE LFS.LOL.

    Ok, I'm done.

    Varun you sound like me with all the pics of rajah. Personally my favorite species is burbidgeae. I have lots of pics to hopefully model my plants after. Unfortunately this has turned out to be the most cold sensitive species I have ever encountered. It's typically and usually the only species in my collection that gets leaf damage below 50 degF in my greenhouse.

    Oh yeah, one more thing.LOL. You know those basals that these tc rajah love to produce? If you want your plant to get really big you will need to remove them all. Pot them up separately but don't let them grow attached to your main plant. My big plant was producing them by leaps and bounds and I just picked them off and tossed them into another pot of mix until I was left with only the one main plant. That's when it started to get really big. Works for vft too...but that's another story!

  8. #48
    N=R* fs fp ne fl fi fc L Pyro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    4,844
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by philcula View Post
    ... an anaerobic disaster? (did I spell that correctly? hmm).
    Yes, you did
    'My love was science- specifically biology and, more specifically, when placed in a common jar, which of two organisms would devour the other.'

    See You Space Cowboy

    actagggcagtgatatcccattggtacatggcaaattagcctcatgat
    Hagerstown, Maryland

    --
    actagggcagtgatatcccattggtacatggcaaattagcctcatgat

Page 6 of 11 FirstFirst ... 2345678910 ... LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •