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Thread: Question - Ants on Nepenthes

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    Capensis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JustLikeAPill View Post

    Just because you read something does not make it true.
    Well, just because you say so does not make it true, there are some unexplainable things on Earth, this is probably one of them. Besides, Nepenthes and Sarracenias are two different sepcies, their nectars might be different. Not trying to be mean or start an arguement, but, yeah...
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    Doing it wrong until I do it right. xvart's Avatar
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    As I recall, there has been research on nectar in recent history, most notably after The Savage Garden was published; the findings of which Clint discusses.

    xvart.
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    Quote Originally Posted by xvart View Post
    As I recall, there has been research on nectar in recent history, most notably after The Savage Garden was published; the findings of which Clint discusses.

    xvart.
    I think that was where I read it from, I can't remember :P. I'm going to do an experiment on that if I have the time with ants.
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  4. #12
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    The fact that I said it doesn't make it true. I said there are no known substances found in Nepenthes at this time. Notice how I said "known" and "at this time". That is the truth. There are none that we know of at this time. If we discover there's some fabulous drug in a plant to be discovered tomorrow, what I said would STILL be true because, at the time of writing, there were no known substances. There is also no evidence to suggest there is anything unusual in the nectar of any known Nepenthes. I'm not saying it's impossible that there is some known or unknown species that produces a known or unknown "narcotic". I AM saying that if there is a species of Nepenthes (or any other CP except S. flava) then we don't KNOW that that species produces a debilitating substance(s), or what substance(s) it produces. You can't say a plant produces a "narcotic" to facilitate it's trapping mechanism just because you want it to be true. -You can say the sky or purple with polka-dots and pin-stripes going down the middle, but unless you're on mescaline it's going to be blue to everyone else.

    I'm well aware that Sarracenia and Nepenthes are two separate genera. The only reason I brought up S. flava was because it is the only CP known to produce any "narcotics" at this time. PLEASE don't try to tell me it's "unexplainable". No substances equals no effects. What you're implying is like saying it's possible to randomly become drunk from eating untainted maple-flavored oatmeal.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JustLikeAPill View Post
    What you're implying is like saying it's possible to randomly become drunk from eating untainted maple-flavored oatmeal.
    Now that would be an interesting moment.
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    Z polski y dumny
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    Your one and only pest! Ant's Avatar
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    Well, maybe it is the insect drinking the nectar! It doesn't need to be the plants nectar. You know that after you eat alot most people want to sleep and become sluggishand slow, so what makes you think some bugs can't act the same way? Also ants seem to be an unlikely catch for my plants, they sit underneath the lid with their legs on the other side of he lid holding them up and avoid the lip.

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    Do you like that... MrFus's Avatar
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    As far as I know the pitchers exhibits a great diversity of mechanism of trapping.

    I Quote from a investigation made by Laurence Gaume and Yoel Forterre (Université de Provence, Technopole Château-Gombert, Marseille, France):

    "In Nepenthes pitcher plants, prey capture and retention is mainly thought to be fulfilled by the slippery waxy layer which covers the upper inner part of the pitcher in most species, or by the peristome or nectar rim of the pitcher (in N. bicalcarata for instance).

    However, some Nepenthes species lack such specialized surfaces or lose them later in development suggesting that the trapping mechanism of Nepenthes pitcher plants is more complex than commonly acknowledged. Moreover, reports of secretion of wetting agents or viscous substances in some species point to other potential roles of the digestive fluid."


    On the conclutions of this investigation they found that the viscoelastic properties of the fluid inside of the pitchers is the main trapping device, and undermines the claim that the pitcher surfaces are the main component of the trapping mechanism in Nepenthes.

    Quote "...the slippery waxy surface of the pitchers was shown to play a minor role in the trapping function of the plant, being even a variable character of weak adaptive significance. In contrast, the viscoelastic and retentive properties of the fluid are probably crucial for this tropical plant often submitted to high rainfall regimes and great variation in fluid concentration, since they persist at high dilutions by water, thereby allowing insect trapping during rainy seasons."

    They have a small video posted of a fly that get on contact with the digestive fluid coming from a N.Rafflesiana and is unable to get free --> http://www.plosone.org:/article/fetc...e.0001185.s003.

    N. Albomarginata, N. Ampullaria
    N. Bellii, N. Bicalcarata, N. Rafflesiana
    N. Sanguinea (Orange Pitcher), Cephalotus Follicularis
    .

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