User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 3 of 9 FirstFirst 1234567 ... LastLast
Results 17 to 24 of 66

Thread: How to foliar feed (properly)

  1. #17
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Metro Atlanta Area
    Posts
    9,681
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Fertilizer does not evaporate or become stronger with time.


    You didn't really measure anything when you fertilized the pitchers. You say "about" a lot and eyeballing it is how people who don't know what they're doing mess up. You used 3/4th teaspoon per gallon. That's too much.

    This is a perfect example of people going crazy with fertilizer. You used three times the amount he should have and surprise, surprise, your pitchers fried. You're now using 3/8th teaspoon per gallon (should be 2/8th) and fertilizes weekly. The extra 1/8th doesn't really matter, it's the fact that you fertilize twice as often at full strength (for Nepenthes, that is). Now you wants to know how you can increase the dosage and if you can ALSO continue to feed insects. This is how the myth gets perpetuated. You're overdoing it. You]re giving it over twice as much as you should, and improperly.

    Your basal really has nothing to do with your overdose. Your plant is large enough to produce basals with or without fertilizer.

  2. #18
    Doing it wrong until I do it right. xvart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Zone 8
    Posts
    5,594
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    To illustrate, below you will find two consecutive pitchers on my N. red dragon. Maybe N. red dragon has such growth spurts, but I attribute the noticeable size difference to the fertilizers. I took a picture of the new third pitcher that is growing, but it is still growing and the size of the second one. I'll update in a few days when it opens and finishes hardening. Or, check out this quick slide show I made to see them on top of each other if that is easier.

    Pitcher One:


    Pitcher Two:


    Notice the pot used for scale is roughly the same size and location in the picture. I tried to get a decent comparison and vantage point for such terrible pictures (I was in a hurry).

    I think the proof is in the pudding, so to speak.

    xvart.
    "The tragedy of life is not that every man loses; but that he almost wins."

    "Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?"

  3. #19
    Katherine
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Stokes Valley, Hutt City, NZ
    Posts
    222
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Have you ever tried fertilsing and feeding bugs? Just curious. Yes i did go overbaord with the fertilsing pitchers, but I realsied this and haven't done it again. I'm not stupid, and I know not to do it now! It wa an experiemnt, to see what would happen, and I'm quite happy with the results.

    There si nothing to say the basal isn't a product of my experiemnt either. I will never know because I don't have any more pitchers to kill off now lol!
    Drosera Arcturi-The Alpine Sundew...

    I'm an AMP People's Choice Applicant this year, please vote for me here:
    http://ampvoting.orcas.co.nz/Applicants/Details/10699

  4. #20
    Katherine
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Stokes Valley, Hutt City, NZ
    Posts
    222
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    What amount fo fertiliser should I use then, and how many pill bugs?
    I read the label on my orchid fertiliser. I think it's different to the fertiliser's overseas. It's recommended dosage is 1 teaspoon for 1 litre, and to give the whole lot to the orchid. It sounds like your recommended dosage is 1 teaspoon per 1 gallon. Maybe you have stronger fertiliser?

    I was thinking of using 1/4 teaspoon per 1.25 litres, so a little under 1/4 strength, and watering with about 1/4 of the bottle a week. This means a 1/4 strength formula would last for 4 weeks, or a month. I was also thinking of supplementing with pill bugs to the ratio of 1 pill bug per 3cm of pitcher height, and rounding down. This means a pitcher 7 cm tall would get 1 pill bug, a 4 cm tall pitcher would get 1 pill bug, a 10cm tall pitcher would get 3 pill bugs. I would do this once a month.

    Does this sound ok?
    Drosera Arcturi-The Alpine Sundew...

    I'm an AMP People's Choice Applicant this year, please vote for me here:
    http://ampvoting.orcas.co.nz/Applicants/Details/10699

  5. #21
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Metro Atlanta Area
    Posts
    9,681
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I never said you were stupid. I've already said how much and how often you should fertilize. I said 1/4th tsp. per gallon and no bugs. NO bugs if you fertilize via the pitchers. Feeding insects is inefficient. There's no real reason to do it when you can fertilize via the pitchers.

    If your fertilizer calls for almost four teaspoons per gallon (3.785 liters per gallon), it must be really weak. What are the three numbers on the front?

    When I say 1/4th tsp, I mean of solid or practically solid. That's generally going to be about what you use. If your fertilizer calls for more or less, just cut that amount in half. You should use 1/2 tsp per liter since yours is a liquid. Sorry I overlooked the fact that your fertilizer is a liquid. You didn't overdose your pitchers, you put water in a pitcher with bugs. This is why your pitchers rotted.

    To be honest, it sounds like the company that made your fertilizer is selling you mostly water. Almost four teaspoons per gallon is a lot when you could buy a solid concentrate like Schultz's. Always go for Urea free.

    Why do I separate ideas like that? It's weird. Anyway, James, your plant looks good. Some plants, like N. truncata (which also happens to be one of the parents) produce exponentially larger pitchers (up to a point, of course) so I'm not really surprised your plant did this. I believe it would have done it if you had never fertilized. HOWEVER, the plant would not have made such a LARGE size difference from pitcher one to pitcher two, and the plant would have also taken longer from start to finish to produce pitcher A, grow the next leaf, then produce pitcher B.

    Those reading this, don't think you can't get these results without fertilizer. You CAN. The difference is that you'll have a shorter life on your pitchers (IME, I've never done a real experiment ), will add a lot of WASTE to your pitchers, can produce a smell, can produce mold (no shaking, either hehe), you can't control it either. If you want to raise or lower the NPK %
    s for whatever reason (for example, to promote the chances of flowering) you can't do that with bugs. Fertilizer is just an efficient, clean way to feed your plants. Even if you are feeding the same amounts of NPK via bugs or fertilizer, the fertilized plant will be cleaner, won't smell, and the old pitchers will look healthier on the fertilized plant versus the bug fed plant (even when feeding them both the same amounts of NPK each way, even though there's really no way to measure the NPK the plant gets when feeding bugs).

  6. #22
    Veronis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
    Posts
    417
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    JustLikeAPill,

    When you fertilize, I assume you do it about every 15 days with 1/4 per gallon as the powdery concentrate calls for 1/2 per gallon - do you fill all the pitchers on the plant to the top, just one or two of them, or do you measure out, say 1 cup and fill a plant's pitchers until you're out of that 1 cup of fert?

    I could have sworn I read that fertilizing the pitcher directly caused the pitcher to die and I know I've seen a non-qualified comment of "and NEVER INTO THE PITCHERS!", but clearly you've had good results from doing this.

    xvart ferts his soil and has a soil mix that resembles mine. I think you said you use LFS as part of your Nep soil mix, and fertilizing the soil/roots has caused you serious mold problems.

    I may try one of each method on two of the same plant and see what happens at some point.

    Edit: I thought you had mentioned in the thread what exact fert you use on your neps, but I don't see it. One more time, with gusto please?

  7. #23
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Metro Atlanta Area
    Posts
    9,681
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Whoo. I'm getting confused lol. Everyone uses something different and metric vs. imperial. OK. I use 1/2 tsp per gallon because MY particular fertilizer calls for 1 tsp. per gallon and because I fertilize every 15 days. If you're fertilizer also calls for 1 tsp per gallon, and you choose to fertilize every 7 days, then you should use 1/4th strength. Whatever your fertilizer says to use, cut that in half to fertilize twice monthy, or cut that into quarters for weekly fertilizing. If I led anyone to believe I use 1/4th tsp, I don't; I use 1/2. Sorry if I confused anyone (different fertilizers, solid vs. liquid, and different units of measurement really confuse matters :P )

    When I fertilize, I fill each and every pitcher all the way to the top. If you've got a very old pitcher that's half dead, cut off the dead part and just fill the living part. I've got pitchers over a year old I'm still filling. Over the course of the next 15 days, the fluid level is going to be approximately where it was before you fertilized. Of course, this will differ with different RH and perhaps even your watering schedule, but that doesn't matter. Fill to the top. Even tiny pitchers, fill them with a syringe.

    Putting time-release pellets like osmocote into a pitcher, especially a small one, can kill it. These pellets are not all the same, so one pellet may be fine but if you had used a different pellet from the same bottle, you may burn your pitcher. These should only be added to the media (and I don't fertilize the roots.) Adding a fertilizer with added Urea could burn your pitchers. Fertilizing with added Urea can burn anything. Adding fertilizer to a pitcher than has caught, or will catch bugs (excluding springtails, and fungus gnatts which all plants outside of a flask will catch. They are too small to matter) can burn the pitcher. Adding water to a pitcher with bugs in it is going to dilute the enzymes and allow the bugs to putrefy and rot your pitcher if there is sufficient mass to allow this. Nepenthes have opercula for a reason, and that's to keep water out and maintain the equilibrium in their pitchers. In cultivation, where you can prevent them from catching bugs by growing inside your home, there's no risk of bugs putrefying so it's safe to add water to the pitchers. Fertilizing the pitchers is the best logical place to do it. The roots are a wirey, fine net of tissue designed to take up water and any nutrients they can absorb quickly, before those nutrients are washed away. The pitchers, OTOH, evolved specifically to catch insects, and absorb the nutrients through the inside. They even have special glands to facilitate this, so to me, that would be the optimal place to do it. Fertilizing via the roots is good for the plant (bad for your LFS based media), but it's sort of a secondary method for the plant to get it's nutrients, the primary method being via the pitcher walls.

    I should note that adding water to your pitchers will weight them down. It won't hurt your plant, but the pitchers will drop down and the leaves will droop down. This is not the equivalent to wilting, the leaves remain just as firm and healthy. This does not harm them, and theoretically can let you grow more plants in less space. Don't count on it :P

    I've used several fertilizers. Organic and inorganic. I don't see a difference, but I've never performed an experiment. Right now I use Alaska Fish Emulsion. Steer clear from Urea when fertilizing any plant. Steer clear of added micro nutrients because added copper and zinc are toxic to Nepenthes. If you're new to fertilizing, have extra cash you don't mind spending for the reassurance of security, and are afraid to use concentrates (solid or liquid), then go buy Terracycle. It's sold pre-mixed. It's a rip off because they're basically selling you dirty water. It can be used full strength without fear, however, and that's the only reason anyone should buy it: if they're new and apprehensive. I purchased it like last spring or so, because it was very earth friendly, but I decided it was too weak and expensive to justify buying. I went back to using concentrates like I had done before.

    I'll post some pictures later with explanations and approximate ages to put your mind at ease.

  8. #24
    Doing it wrong until I do it right. xvart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Zone 8
    Posts
    5,594
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Valydius View Post
    Edit: I thought you had mentioned in the thread what exact fert you use on your neps, but I don't see it. One more time, with gusto please?
    With gusto? Okay, you asked for it:

    Better Gro Orchid Plus 20-14-13!!!!!!

    Mind you, I'm not trying to induce flowering or do anything super special or cool, as Phission mentioned. That's a whole other ballgame.

    xvart.
    "The tragedy of life is not that every man loses; but that he almost wins."

    "Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?"

Page 3 of 9 FirstFirst 1234567 ... LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •