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Thread: Highlander/intermediates that can grow as lowlanders.

  1. #17

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    Hi there:

    Most philllippino species can grow well under lowland conditions:
    Ventricosa, copelandii, truncata, mira, alata
    Also: intermediate range plants like vogelii and platychila
    Tobaicas, veitchiis, most maximas, khasianas, etc

  2. #18

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    Cool... next available platychila I see, I'll give a try. Mira as well.
    I have some cuttings of nice heavily speckled echinostomas from Trent rooting...
    maybe, maybe, I'll get lucky with a trade.

  3. #19

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    I tried N. sibuyanensis and I don't think it would be a good idea in a hot climate. There is a hybrid called N. x medusa which is a hybrid of N. sibuyanensis and N. bellii. It looks very similar to N. sibuyanensis and is a much faster grower. It prefers lowland conditions.

  4. #20
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    I've heard N. tenuis grows well as a lowlander. I was just speaking to someone in Thailand who's been growing a very nice specimen. Lets see if it's in my inbox... 77 to 83 degrees at night and 86 to 95 during the day. Someone PM'd me about them cutting theirs to trade, and said they'd post about it, but I never heard back from him. I'd like to try this species some time. N. gymnamphora is a species you can try. If you like hybrids, that really gives you more variety.

  5. #21

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    I would like to add a bit more about N. gymnamphora.
    N. gymnamphora is a fairly widespread nepenthes with an altitude range of 600m-2800m. It is one of the few nepethes that has both lowland and ultrahighland populations. There is a good number of clones in commercial circulation, many if you consider N. pectinata and N. xiphioides varieties of N. gymnamphora. In a lowland environment, getting a random N. gymnamphora is a bit of a gamble. Depending on where it originated from, it could die or it could thrive. Luckily, N. gymnamphora is usually inexpensive, so it is not too risky to experiment a bit.

    N. gymnamphora is my favorite species personally. The Atlanta Botanical Gardens, where I used to intern at and now volunteer at, has a massive speciment on display.

  6. #22
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    I can tell you that the one that came from the northeast US supplier did very well for me with night of only 70 degrees. It was a very small plant that looked almost stunted it was so compact, but it grew fast and made perfectly formed pitchers that were in proportion with the rest of the plant, so I'm thinking it was just the habit of the clone.

    It's an underrated plant with a cute toothed peristome.

  7. #23

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    nice... I'll try gymnamphora when I have a chance.

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