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Thread: Cutting Cuts

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    Doing it wrong until I do it right. xvart's Avatar
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    Cutting Cuts

    A while back I was having a conversation with someone via private messanging and decided to go ahead and post the gist of that conversation here, with some minor experiment and observation.

    I had done a lot of reading about Nepenthes cuttings recently, and decided to try a little experiment. I received a cutting of N. ventricosa from ilbasso and decided to cut it up a little more and root in water. I had three total, one with the top growth point and two mid sections (of approximate equal size). The two middle sections went into water. The difference in the two cuttings was how the bottom of each section was prepared prior to being submerged in water.

    Some of you may have read here or elsewhere about cutting up into the stem/vine. The thinking behind this is, I've learned, to expose more tissue and surface area to promote more root growth.

    On one cutting I made two vertical slits up the stem (see next picture) while on the other cutting I just left as a straight cut through the stem. I made the cuts around 6/7/08 and both cuttings currently have two activated nodes.



    About a month later there is already a noticeable difference between promoted root growth on both cuttings. The straight cut has no noticeable root growth while the crossed vertical cuts have obvious root growth.

    Straight cut:


    Vertical cross cuts:


    You may see a little point on the first picture that could be mistaken for a root. It is not a root; but rather, where I sliced through a leaf attachment. I've read and heard of others doing other types of vertical cuts in including multiple parallel cuts and as many vertical cuts as possible.

    Disclaimer: I'm not endorsing the water method of rooting for all types of Nepenthes, but it certainly has worked for N. ventricosa. I've read and heard about mixed results with other species; but, I just wanted to show one example of comparable differences in cutting methods.

    It seems obvious to me that no matter how you actually root your cuttings (water, media, LFS, etc.) exposing more tissue will only be of benefit to promoting substantial root growth.

    There are plenty of other examples floating around out there and I encourage you to find other, more experienced cutters "testimonials."

    xvart.
    "The tragedy of life is not that every man loses; but that he almost wins."

    "Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?"

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    Z polski y dumny
    Prayer - how to do nothing and still think you're helping.
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    BigBella's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by xvart View Post
    A while back I was having a conversation with someone via private messanging and decided to go ahead and post the gist of that conversation here, with some minor experiment and observation.

    I had done a lot of reading about Nepenthes cuttings recently, and decided to try a little experiment. I received a cutting of N. ventricosa from ilbasso and decided to cut it up a little more and root in water. I had three total, one with the top growth point and two mid sections (of approximate equal size). The two middle sections went into water. The difference in the two cuttings was how the bottom of each section was prepared prior to being submerged in water.

    Some of you may have read here or elsewhere about cutting up into the stem/vine. The thinking behind this is, I've learned, to expose more tissue and surface area to promote more root growth.

    On one cutting I made two vertical slits up the stem (see next picture) while on the other cutting I just left as a straight cut through the stem. I made the cuts around 6/7/08 and both cuttings currently have two activated nodes.


    About a month later there is already a noticeable difference between promoted root growth on both cuttings. The straight cut has no noticeable root growth while the crossed vertical cuts have obvious root growth.

    Straight cut:

    Vertical cross cuts:

    You may see a little point on the first picture that could be mistaken for a root. It is not a root; but rather, where I sliced through a leaf attachment. I've read and heard of others doing other types of vertical cuts in including multiple parallel cuts and as many vertical cuts as possible.

    Disclaimer: I'm not endorsing the water method of rooting for all types of Nepenthes, but it certainly has worked for N. ventricosa. I've read and heard about mixed results with other species; but, I just wanted to show one example of comparable differences in cutting methods.

    It seems obvious to me that no matter how you actually root your cuttings (water, media, LFS, etc.) exposing more tissue will only be of benefit to promoting substantial root growth.

    There are plenty of other examples floating around out there and I encourage you to find other, more experienced cutters "testimonials."

    xvart.
    I have always scored Nepenthes cuttings before planting in media but have never attempted to root them in only water. Are the cuttings simply in a glass of water in bright light? Are rooting hormones used or fungicides? Also, in which species would this method be risky?
    “Sì perché l'autorità dell'opinione di mille nelle scienze non val per una scintilla di ragione di un solo . . ."

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    Also, in which species would this method be risky?
    Any that you really want to root. Nepenthes don't like to root when the cut is exposed to light. If you have 100 cuttings in water, and 50 were in a black container, and the others had their cuts exposed to light, you'd have a much higher success rate in the group in the dark containers. Someone actually did that experiment on Nepenthes, but I can't find it anymore .

    Water rooting also takes a long time. Guess how long the plant in my pic took to grow all those roots?
    (it was ~3 weeks)
    Z polski y dumny
    Prayer - how to do nothing and still think you're helping.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5F5aCUNE4Z8
    ^^^Newest vid

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    BigBella's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phissionkorps View Post

    Any that you really want to root. Nepenthes don't like to root when the cut is exposed to light. If you have 100 cuttings in water, and 50 were in a black container, and the others had their cuts exposed to light, you'd have a much higher success rate in the group in the dark containers. Someone actually did that experiment on Nepenthes, but I can't find it anymore .

    Water rooting also takes a long time. Guess how long the plant in my pic took to grow all those roots?
    (it was ~3 weeks)
    Thanks for the info. Good to know. It took a couple of months just to get some Nepenthes hamata cuttings off and growing last August in standard LFS media, though I've heard horror stories of just how long it can take -- even under the best conditions -- to get some other species going . . .
    “Sì perché l'autorità dell'opinione di mille nelle scienze non val per una scintilla di ragione di un solo . . ."

    -- Galileo "Biff" Galilei

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    Moderator Cindy's Avatar
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    I root most of my cuttings in water and they root easily. Some species take longer than others. I have the cuttings in recycled plastic 1.5L bottles and they are put in a place with good light, great air circulation but no direct sunlight. For more precious and rare species, I prefer to use perlite for rooting.

    The longest I have waited for roots is N. gracilis. Six months...but I think it is just that particular plant. Other N. gracilis cuttings rooted within 2-3 weeks.

    I also split the stem like xvart does but with a little modification. I leave the core of the stem intact and split only the outer ring of plant tissue.

    My growing conditions are lowland year round, with little day/night temperature difference.
    Cindy

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    Doing it wrong until I do it right. xvart's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phissionkorps View Post
    Nepenthes don't like to root when the cut is exposed to light. If you have 100 cuttings in water, and 50 were in a black container, and the others had their cuts exposed to light, you'd have a much higher success rate in the group in the dark containers. Someone actually did that experiment on Nepenthes, but I can't find it anymore .
    I'd be interested in reading whatever format of results from that experiment if you ever come across it again. It makes does make sense, though.

    xvart.
    "The tragedy of life is not that every man loses; but that he almost wins."

    "Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?"

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    Captain Hamata's Avatar
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    Someone should also experiment with the size of the container that holds the water and cuttings. I had heard that plants release a chemical that promotes root growth. The more water the container holds, the more diluted the chemical becomes and slows the rooting process? I suppose constantly changing out the water would also slow down the rooting process. I also heard that roots that are formed in water are different than roots that are formed in media. And when cuttings are switched from water to media, the plants have to expend energy and regrow their roots.
    Presents are the best way to show someone how much you care. It is like this tangible thing that you can point to and say 'Hey man, I love you this many dollars worth. -Michael Scott, The Office

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