User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: "Giant 'meat-eating' plant found" (Nepenthes attenboroughii)

  1. #1
    mcantrell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Twin Falls, ID, USA
    Posts
    497
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    "Giant 'meat-eating' plant found" (Nepenthes attenboroughii)

    Someone sent me this at work. Somehow, I have a rep for being "The meat eatin' plat guy" here at MyJob. heh

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/earth/hi/earth...00/8195029.stm

    Giant 'meat-eating' plant found
    Matt Walker
    Editor, Earth News

    A new species of giant carnivorous plant has been discovered in the highlands of the central Philippines.
    The pitcher plant is among the largest of all pitchers and is so big that it can catch rats as well as insects in its leafy trap.
    During the same expedition, botanists also came across strange pink ferns and blue mushrooms they could not identify.
    The botanists have named the pitcher plant after British natural history broadcaster David Attenborough.
    They published details of the discovery in the Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society earlier this year.

    Word that this new species of pitcher plant existed initially came from two Christian missionaries who in 2000 attempted to scale Mount Victoria, a rarely visited peak in central Palawan in the Philippines.
    With little preparation, the missionaries attempted to climb the mountain but became lost for 13 days before being rescued from the slopes.
    On their return, they described seeing a large carnivorous pitcher plant.
    That pricked the interest of natural history explorer Stewart McPherson of Red Fern Natural History Productions based in Poole, Dorset, UK and independent botanist Alastair Robinson, formerly of the University of Cambridge, UK and Andreas Fleischmann of Ludwig-Maximilians University in Munich, Germany.

    All three are pitcher plant experts, having travelled to remote locations in the search for new species.
    So in 2007, they set off on a two-month expedition to the Philippines, which included an attempt at scaling Mount Victoria to find this exotic new plant.
    Accompanied by three guides, the team hiked through lowland forest, finding large stands of a pitcher plant known to science called Nepenthes philippinensis, as well as strange pink ferns and blue mushrooms which they could not identify.
    As they closed in on the summit, the forest thinned until eventually they were walking among scrub and large boulders
    "At around 1,600 metres above sea level, we suddenly saw one great pitcher plant, then a second, then many more," McPherson recounts.
    "It was immediately apparent that the plant we had found was not a known species."

    Pitcher plants are carnivorous. Carnivorous plants come in many forms, and are known to have independently evolved at least six separate times. While some have sticky surfaces that act like flypaper, others like the Venus fly trap are snap traps, closing their leaves around their prey.
    Pitchers create tube-like leaf structures into which insects and other small animals tumble and become trapped.
    The team has placed type specimens of the new species in the herbarium of the Palawan State University, and have named the plant Nepenthes attenboroughii after broadcaster and natural historian David Attenborough.
    "The plant is among the largest of all carnivorous plant species and produces spectacular traps as large as other species which catch not only insects, but also rodents as large as rats," says McPherson.

    The pitcher plant does not appear to grow in large numbers, but McPherson hopes the remote, inaccessible mountain-top location, which has only been climbed a handful of times, will help prevent poachers from reaching it.
    During the expedition, the team also encountered another pitcher, Nepenthes deaniana, which had not been seen in the wild for 100 years. The only known existing specimens of the species were lost in a herbarium fire in 1945.
    On the way down the mountain, the team also came across a striking new species of sundew, a type of sticky trap plant, which they are in the process of formally describing.
    Thought to be a member of the genus Drosera, the sundew produces striking large, semi-erect leaves which form a globe of blood red foliage.
    Some good pictures in the article. It looks a lot like that Nep that they recently discovered ate small mammal feces instead of bugs. Forget it's name.

  2. #2
    SirKristoff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Puyallup, WA United States
    Posts
    4,132
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    N. attenboroughii isnt new really, its been around as N. spec. D.A
    its been mentioned on pitcherplants.proboards many times and has a rather large convo on it.
    Its a gorgeous species, ill give it that.

  3. #3
    RL7836's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    New Jersey, USA
    Posts
    3,252
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    .... a striking new species of sundew, a type of sticky trap plant, which they are in the process of formally describing. Thought to be a member of the genus Drosera, the sundew produces striking large, semi-erect leaves which form a globe of blood red foliage.
    Has more info appeared on this sundew yet?
    All the best,
    Ron
    You must do the thing you think you cannot do. --- Eleanor Roosevelt

    *** Growlist / Wants / Offers ***
    (with Pics)

  4. #4
    mcantrell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Twin Falls, ID, USA
    Posts
    497
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    A.. globe? Like what, a Chinese Lantern?



    A Drosera that grew like that would be neat as all getout!

  5. #5
    Always a newbie glider14's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Louisville, Kentucky
    Posts
    3,956
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    It looks a lot like that Nep that they recently discovered ate small mammal feces instead of bugs. Forget it's name.
    N. lowii? its not recently discovered.

    does anyone have any news on N. attenboroughii other than we have seedlings? lots of people have the seedlings. but are there any new pics on the plants anywhere?

    and what ever happened to N. peltata? now that is a pretty plant too!!

    Alex
    Everything is explainable. The seemingly unexplainable is but a result of our insufficient knowledge.- Hans Brewer

  6. #6
    mcantrell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Twin Falls, ID, USA
    Posts
    497
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by glider14 View Post
    N. lowii? its not recently discovered.

    does anyone have any news on N. attenboroughii other than we have seedlings? lots of people have the seedlings. but are there any new pics on the plants anywhere?

    and what ever happened to N. peltata? now that is a pretty plant too!!

    Alex
    Sorry, I misspoke. They recently discovered that N. Lowii ate poop instead of bugs. Or at least, they decided to let the rest of the world know.

Similar Threads

  1. Cephalotus "Hummer's Giant" -- Get The Kids Started On One Today! RSS $75
    By BigBella in forum 2009 NASC Benefit Auction
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 04-30-2009, 07:46 PM
  2. Cephalotus "Hummer's Giant" plant
    By Clint in forum Carnivorous Plant Trading Post
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 01-28-2008, 07:45 AM
  3. Baby Cephalotus "Hummer's Giant" for trade. Pics!
    By Clint in forum Carnivorous Plant Trading Post
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11-04-2007, 02:40 PM
  4. Drosera intermedia "Carolina Giant" Winner philcula
    By Bugweed in forum 2006 NASC Benefit Auction
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 05-06-2007, 07:09 AM
  5. Drosera intermedia & "carolina giant" for trade
    By Shrek in forum Carnivorous Plant Trading Post
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 09-24-2003, 08:45 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •