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Thread: Too Much Lumens?

  1. #9
    Entwadumela's Avatar
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    Okay Marius, aka marc.ca,

    After an hour of the light being on, my current reading in the bical terror-rium is 94 degrees temp and 90% humidity. At the hour mark, the edges of the new leaf start to go droopy, I believe at the 2 hour point the main rib of the new leaft starts to droop down and the 3 hour mark (as seen two days ago) the entire leaf is 3/4 limp. But again, after I turn off the light, in about an hour, the leaf is almost completely erect.

    The planting media (pure New Zealand spagnum moss) is damp, and none of the other leaves are affected by this supplemental lighting.

    I guess the answers are:

    1) go slow with introducing this new supplemental lighting. Start with shorter artificial light
    times, then gradually increase it.

    2) go with a lower wattage. But would increasing the distance be just as good?

    3) go full bore, let the leaves die back and adapt to the new conditions, and become stronger
    for it.

    I like number 3, but I'm afraid that if the plant dies back, with my luck, it won't recover So I will probably go with door number 1.

    I know bicals in the wilds are mostly found in hot, steamy, swampy, shady area, but many also thrive in brightly lit areas. Hence the long leaf swamp version and the short broad sunny versions.

    I guess if the plant is healthy, providied with the right temp and humidity, it will adapt to almost any lighting situations.

    Just thought this limp leaf thing was kinda weird and was wondering if anyone had experieced this before or had an explanation to what was happening and if their was anyting I should worry about or change.

    But comments and suggestions are still welcome

    Good Growing and Happy Holidays,
    E
    "My Greatest Fear Is, When I Die, The Missus Will Sell All My Stuff For What I Told Her I Got It For"

    I bought a cactus. A week later it died. And I got depressed, because I thought, Damn. I am less nurturing than a desert.

  2. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Entwadumela View Post



    2) go with a lower wattage. But would increasing the distance be just as good?


    E
    Yes, just remember the drop in lumens to distance is exponential rather than linear.

  3. #11
    Veronis's Avatar
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    It's not a flytrap, so I agree with you, option 1 is probably best, with some option 2. Sudden environment changes will shock just about any plant.

    Increasing the distance would have the same effect as getting a lesser bulb since the light intensity will be lessened, but keep in mind you're paying the same amount for the electrical output even if most of the light is going to waste, and without measuring it, there's no way of knowing exactly how much X light is lost by increasing Y distance:
    Quote Originally Posted by F R e N c H 3 z View Post
    Yes, just remember the drop in lumens to distance is exponential rather than linear.
    A 250W CFL is a LOT of light for a terrarium that size; the thing is probably pushing out close to 20K lumens. Imo a 125-150W CFL would be a good size/output strength for your terrarium and your nep. I'm guessing, but I'd say 12-18 inches is probably a good height above the plants for that CFL once they're used to it.

    If it's getting direct sunlight every day, it would be easy to overdue the lighting with that CFL, as you've already seen. I'm no expert on this, but I think you'd do better if you take the route where you start with the same hours (light cycle) you'll always have but at a larger distance, say 20" to start (?), and slowly decrease the distance to the plant while never modifying its light cycle - it'll more closely emulate natural sunlight intensity increases...
    as opposed to keeping the CFL at the same distance from the plant and playing with how many hours you run it; you're more likely to shock your nep this way.

  4. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Veronis View Post
    and without measuring it, there's no way of knowing exactly how much X light is lost by increasing Y distance:
    I believe attenuation has been measured, the law which applies to it is called the inverse square law (if my College physics classes serve me right). Or were you referring to this specific case?
    In either case the cheapest electrical cost would be a T5 setup though your initial investment in the structure would also be the most expensive (in comparison to T8 & T12).

  5. #13
    Veronis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by F R e N c H 3 z View Post
    I believe attenuation has been measured, the law which applies to it is called the inverse square law. Or were you referring to this specific case?
    I meant this specific case. And by "measuring" I just meant using a light meter.

    E.g. - http://www.planetnatural.com/site/grow-light-meter.html on the '500' setting.

    I like Barry's piece on light intensity too; I've yet to try it, but I'd really like to: http://www.sarracenia.com/faq/faq3400.html

  6. #14
    Entwadumela's Avatar
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    Hiya Veronis-

    I really liked that Rice "light" article . . . thanks

    E
    "My Greatest Fear Is, When I Die, The Missus Will Sell All My Stuff For What I Told Her I Got It For"

    I bought a cactus. A week later it died. And I got depressed, because I thought, Damn. I am less nurturing than a desert.

  7. #15
    Entwadumela's Avatar
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    As I continued my research regarding light stress on my new bical, I came across this article:

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0722105048.htm

    It mentions how some plants turn red to compensate for being stressed under intense lighting, and I know many CP plants turn red when given long, intense photoperiods, so I'm wondering if they are under stress and just adapt to the situation

    Hmmmm . . .

    E
    "My Greatest Fear Is, When I Die, The Missus Will Sell All My Stuff For What I Told Her I Got It For"

    I bought a cactus. A week later it died. And I got depressed, because I thought, Damn. I am less nurturing than a desert.

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