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Thread: Succumbing to French Roast Pressure . . .

  1. #17
    BigBella's Avatar
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    Here is a shot of that very same pot this afternoon. In all of the time that I have had that plant -- some three years or more -- I have yet to trim the sphagnum moss to prevent it from overtaking the Nepenthes -- that is, until after that first "coffee treatment" on 13 March . . .

    Nepenthes villosa -- 22 April 2010
    “Sì perché l'autorità dell'opinione di mille nelle scienze non val per una scintilla di ragione di un solo . . ."

    -- Galileo "Biff" Galilei

  2. #18
    Eats genetically engineered tomatoes Sig's Avatar
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    Well, now the people who grow sphagnum know what to water it with!
    Formerly known as Silenceisgod!

  3. #19
    Carnivorous plant enthusiast vraev's Avatar
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    wow...u actually had the sphagnum grow...my media all became ridden with algae when I tried coffee.

  4. #20
    Not Growing Up! GrowinOld's Avatar
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    I for one find your using orchid fertilizer as part of you common standard of great value. Pouring coffee over unfertilized plants only tells us that coffee carries fertilizer values, something plant growers have known for years.
    Whether it has some other qualities that affects Neps (or other CP's) growth "other than" it's fertilizer value is still yet unknown (Like the acids in the coffee, or some other component.)
    So while some people feel the experiment is less than ideal under the circumstances, I feel it is actually more appropriate. (Comparing a plant receiving coffee treatments to one totally starving, would only illustrate what to me would be expected already. But at this point your experiment addresses the next obvious question, which hasn't been looked into yet.)

    Concerning the sphagnum, are you applying coffee to the sphagnum itself or pouring the coffee thru it... and more importantly, are you applying it the same way as you do when applying the fertilizer? (I am curious if the coffee/fertilizer is having affects when applied to the "growing parts"/"leaf zone" of the sphagnum as compared to the "lower portions"/"root zone".) This could have bearing to when people experience "burn", algae, etc. when they do it.

    While some people have had fertilizer burn to sphagnum, I have lately had rather good growth from it, unexpectedly.
    Well, keep up the experiments. I am interested to see the results long term.
    Oh yea... Are you photographing the 18 subjects for posting later? Also, I looked but couldn't find... aside from the initial coffee treatment, do you plan on doing the coffee treatment on a regular basis? If so, how far apart? (If you already mentioned, I am sorry I didn't see it... mind ain't working well lately.)

    Well, good luck. It is nice to see you can afford to experiment on such valued plants. Makes seeing the results that much more interesting!
    Experience is the best teacher. At least it used to be.
    But then, common sense isn't so common anymore, is it.


    http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...d.php?t=113866

  5. #21
    BigBella's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrowinOld View Post
    I for one find your using orchid fertilizer as part of you common standard of great value. Pouring coffee over unfertilized plants only tells us that coffee carries fertilizer values, something plant growers have known for years.
    Whether it has some other qualities that affects Neps (or other CP's) growth "other than" it's fertilizer value is still yet unknown (Like the acids in the coffee, or some other component.)
    So while some people feel the experiment is less than ideal under the circumstances, I feel it is actually more appropriate. (Comparing a plant receiving coffee treatments to one totally starving, would only illustrate what to me would be expected already. But at this point your experiment addresses the next obvious question, which hasn't been looked into yet.)

    Concerning the sphagnum, are you applying coffee to the sphagnum itself or pouring the coffee thru it... and more importantly, are you applying it the same way as you do when applying the fertilizer? (I am curious if the coffee/fertilizer is having affects when applied to the "growing parts"/"leaf zone" of the sphagnum as compared to the "lower portions"/"root zone".) This could have bearing to when people experience "burn", algae, etc. when they do it.

    While some people have had fertilizer burn to sphagnum, I have lately had rather good growth from it, unexpectedly.
    Well, keep up the experiments. I am interested to see the results long term.
    Oh yea... Are you photographing the 18 subjects for posting later? Also, I looked but couldn't find... aside from the initial coffee treatment, do you plan on doing the coffee treatment on a regular basis? If so, how far apart? (If you already mentioned, I am sorry I didn't see it... mind ain't working well lately.)

    Well, good luck. It is nice to see you can afford to experiment on such valued plants. Makes seeing the results that much more interesting!
    Thanks . . .

    The way things were worked out was more out of necessity than carefully planned, since I only had a few plants available to experiment upon; and I had already been using 1/4 strength 30:10:10 orchid fertilizers on all of the Nepenthes for several years.

    I applied the coffee in the same manner as the fertilizer, by pouring it through the media -- over the plant leaves themselves -- until it visibly drained, as one would conventionally water any plant. Initially, I was somewhat concerned about algal growth, though I had never experienced a problem or damage to the sphagnum moss with the dilute fertilizer in the past; but I was worried about the possible effects of the added coffee.

    There turned out to be no need for concern, and I immediately noticed a marked increased growth of the sphagnum within ten days of the coffee application -- and, visibly, more rapid growth of the plants themselves (notable because most of the highlanders, otherwise, develop very slowly).

    I have only applied the coffee once and the most current recommendation is treatment every six months; provided that no harm comes to the plants, I will continue using it. The 30:10:10 has been applied biweekly throughout this time.

    I will post photos of the other -- eighteen -- subjects down the line; whether I can "afford" to experiment on them remains to be seen. I honestly don't wish to kill my plants or attempt to replace them . . .

    I am also awaiting a shipment of more -- expendable -- Nepenthes seeds to more formally experiment upon . . .
    “Sì perché l'autorità dell'opinione di mille nelle scienze non val per una scintilla di ragione di un solo . . ."

    -- Galileo "Biff" Galilei

  6. #22
    Av8tor1's Avatar
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    David,

    Do you brew your coffee in the typical American strength?.... LOL, and then do you dilute before application?

    If you read the historical advise for coffee use, most resources (non-cp) recommend a 25% strength dilution.

    Thanks mate, enquiring minds want to know


    Butch

  7. #23
    BigBella's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Av8tor1 View Post
    David,

    Do you brew your coffee in the typical American strength?.... LOL, and then do you dilute before application?

    If you read the historical advise for coffee use, most resources (non-cp) recommend a 25% strength dilution.

    Thanks mate, enquiring minds want to know


    Butch
    I definitely prefer coffee on the strong side and thought it best to dilute it a bit (by about 25%), and prepared a liter with breakfast. Strangely enough though, the pots still smelled of coffee for days afterwords -- especially those in the sun . . .
    “Sì perché l'autorità dell'opinione di mille nelle scienze non val per una scintilla di ragione di un solo . . ."

    -- Galileo "Biff" Galilei

  8. #24
    Av8tor1's Avatar
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    David,

    I prefer mine a little on the strong side as well.... tends to be a little weak on this side of the pond
    Do you mean 25% coffee or 25% water?
    The non-cp refs state 25% coffee, but they may be using it much more frequently...

    Butch

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