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Thread: Conclusions on ampullaria x talangensis

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    Zhilin's Avatar
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    Conclusions on ampullaria x talangensis

    Just ordered this plant. So I searched previous threads discussing on this hybrid. Based on what I read, the conclusions seem to be: like lowland condition, high humidity. Does anyone success in growing it under highland or intermediate conditions? The BE said this plant grows well under both highland and lowland conditions.

    I am growing another hybrid N. ampullaria (red) x N. sibuyanensis. It is growing well in my HL terrarium (at least in the past half year, when the lowest night temperature was about 55F). The seller said since N.sibuyanensis is not true highlander, the hybrid prefers intermediate condition. Compared to N.sibuyanensis, talangensis is true highlander. So is it possible that ampullaria x talangensis can grow well at least under intermediate condition?
    Last edited by Zhilin; 08-19-2010 at 11:31 PM.
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    I a bit off topic question.

    Do ampullaria hybrids have carpeting behavior like the regular ampullarias?

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    I dont grow this plant, but I will give you the moral support in that I think your logic is correct with growing it under intermediate conditions. One thing I will add, though, is that from the pictures I have found it seems to take after the ampullaria parent as far as morphology goes, so perhaps you should lean on the side of lowlander?

    Just as much, though, if your particular clone seems to take more after the talangensis side, perhaps leaning towards the highland side of intermediate might be better.

    Good growing!
    CJ

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    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    Bit surprised they are still out there for sale. They have not been offered by the supplier again because of some uncertainty in the cross. All the plants I received and have seen from photos so far show no signs of N. talangensis in the plant at all, including both leaves and pitchers. They also hated my intermediate/cool greenhouse this past winter and were about to kick the bucket before things started to warm up a bit. They behave in every way shape and form to pure N. ampullaria.
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

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    jimmy uphwiz's Avatar
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    Here is mine grown totally in a lowland terr for 8 months plus, where's talagensis Hmmm ?

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    I wouldnt try highland with mine, I don't think it could possibly do any better for me,
    I guess the talagensis might show its self in different conditions, but as Tony said and many others agree, I'm still not completely convinced there is any talagensis in this amp at all.

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    Zhilin's Avatar
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    Thank you guys.

    Hi, Tony and Jimmy, are your plants seed grown? I guess, if seed grown, then plants may show more characteristics of pure amp due to the unstability of DNA of the hybrid.

    I just got reply from the seller, saying mine comes from TC, not seed grown, of BE. The seller is growing the plant under intermediate condition. That's a good news. Actually, I love amp (red and green). But I can't provide LL condition due to my limited space. So, I would be happy if the plant can grow well under intermediate condition, no matter how it looks like talengensis.

    PS: Jimmy, I love your plant. Very beautiful. And lots of my knowledge on this hybrid come from your two threads on it. Thanks.

    ---------- Post added at 03:19 PM ---------- Previous post was at 03:17 PM ----------

    I think so. See Jimmy's pictures above.

    Quote Originally Posted by raimeiken View Post
    I a bit off topic question.

    Do ampullaria hybrids have carpeting behavior like the regular ampullarias?
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    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    Mine were supposed to be seed grown so it is possible that some other plants are what they are supposed to be. I still have my doubts though. I have seen plants from the tc batch as well and they look just like mine.

    "unstability of DNA" ? not sure what you mean. There will be some variation between different plants on how much one parent is expressed than the other but the range of difference will be the same between seed grown or tc plants. Provided of course there are a large number of different clones in the tc batch.

    Show me a plant.. any plant either seed grown or tc from this cross that has anything but N. ampullaria in it and I may change my mind. Jimmy's plant producing carpet pitchers at this stage just cements it even more that they are pure N. ampullaria. I have not seen a single N. ampullaria hybrid produce carpet pitchers like N. ampullaria. I am not saying that it is impossible but I think the odds of it being a hybrid and producing the carpet pitchers are very slim.

    All that aside.. They are still very nice plants and you can't go wrong with a nice red N. ampullaria. But I did want to 'warn' that they do not like cool temperatures for prolonged periods, and you most likely will never see any N. talangensis traits in the plant.
    N. ampullaria in general is a bit more tolerant than other lowland species so if you can provide warm days in the 80's and nights that are low 60's or above then you should be fine.

    Tony
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    Zhilin's Avatar
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    Thank you, Tony. I just ordered it, have not yet received it. So I don't know what it looks like. Anyway, I hope it can grow well under intermediate condition (not expect it can go well under highland condition). I'll grow it with my amp x sib. Let's see what will happen in the coming few months.


    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Paroubek View Post
    Mine were supposed to be seed grown so it is possible that some other plants are what they are supposed to be. I still have my doubts though. I have seen plants from the tc batch as well and they look just like mine.

    "unstability of DNA" ? not sure what you mean. There will be some variation between different plants on how much one parent is expressed than the other but the range of difference will be the same between seed grown or tc plants. Provided of course there are a large number of different clones in the tc batch.

    Show me a plant.. any plant either seed grown or tc from this cross that has anything but N. ampullaria in it and I may change my mind. Jimmy's plant producing carpet pitchers at this stage just cements it even more that they are pure N. ampullaria. I have not seen a single N. ampullaria hybrid produce carpet pitchers like N. ampullaria. I am not saying that it is impossible but I think the odds of it being a hybrid and producing the carpet pitchers are very slim.

    All that aside.. They are still very nice plants and you can't go wrong with a nice red N. ampullaria. But I did want to 'warn' that they do not like cool temperatures for prolonged periods, and you most likely will never see any N. talangensis traits in the plant.
    N. ampullaria in general is a bit more tolerant than other lowland species so if you can provide warm days in the 80's and nights that are low 60's or above then you should be fine.

    Tony
    My Grow-List and Want-List
    If you know other unique plants that can walk, can talk, can sing, or can eat people, please tell me and I definitely want to get one.

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