User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 9 to 16 of 21

Thread: Nepenthes not pitchering

  1. #9
    wicked good plants! Presto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    1,257
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You know, it seems like your growing conditions are right on the money. And if they're already at 80-100% humidity, spraying seems a little redundant. My guess is that they're still sulking from the traumas of moving and being sat on by a cat...how long ago were those events?
    -Emily

  2. #10
    Aristoloingulamata Dexenthes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Southern Tongass Rainforest, Alaska
    Posts
    3,708
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by emre View Post
    Okay, I'll mist them daily and see if that helps. They seem to have a very slow metabolism: it takes weeks for a new leaf to fully grow. Somehow they also keep their number of leaves constant, around two or three. I have a theory: they need pitchers to absorb nutrients, and nutrients to grow pitchers, so they cannot break the cycle. I know that fertilisers = no pitchers, but maybe foliar feeding would help?
    Some people swear by foliar feeding. I personally have no tried it. The coffee treatment method is another one that many grows have started doing. I've tried that once or twice and saw some noticeable effect. That being said, I've seen some people over-do the coffee before too.

    Also, of course, because I suck at Celsius conversion, I just checked and it seems that the day temp for the ampullaria could be as high as 32 Celsius comfortably, with a drop at night of down to maybe 25ish.

    And exo is right, as far as I know ampullaria are not necessarily plants that need to be blasted with light, so the plants are possibly getting too much of it. It makes sense, if they supposedly ingest detritus through their pitchers in the wild, then that would mean they are no strangers to having trees or other shrubs above them.
    LOOKING FOR: N. (argentii x bicalcarata) x {[(lingulata x edwardsiana) x (naga x hamata)] x [(klossii x undulatifolia) x (aristolochioides x rajah)]} Growlist: http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...d.php?t=124586

  3. #11

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    57
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by eou812 View Post
    That's exactly what is happening to my neps (ventricosa) no pitchers produces the little fines but then shrivvles up?
    Well, I hope we can find a solution together.

    Quote Originally Posted by i<3carnivores View Post
    I'd say they're not warm enough. IIRC Amps are pretty high up on the lowland scale, and considering your heli isn't melting...I think that'd be the case. Lowlanders typically aren't ones to creep slowly in growth.
    Just my humble suggestion.
    Good luck! Everything else looks great. And I like your taste in fish...bichirs =
    Thanks! Yes, bichirs are way awesome. Mine are babies, so I'm still watching them grow. The temperature range is 25-30 C (regulated by water heater) and from what I've read, anything higher than this must be dangerous for plants. H. minor, unlike other Heliamphoras, is not a strictly highland plant and can live in lower altitudes in nature. Hence the (apparently) lowland compatibility.

    Quote Originally Posted by jht-union View Post
    your plants look good, misting the tip of the tendril(basically the pitcher) will help a lot, remember that where they live it rains almost everyday, so the upcoming pitchers must need of water to grow properly!
    Good luck with them!
    I will do that! Thanks for your comments and advice.

    ---------- Post added at 10:26 PM ---------- Previous post was at 10:13 PM ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by Exo View Post
    The temps and humidity are fine....so why they aren't pitchering is a bit of a mystery to me....I can tell you that the leaf in the final pic has gotten WAY too much light....so it is probably too stressed to pitcher....you may want to shade it a bit.

    My ampullaria pitchers well with even less optimal temps and humidity than yours, so my guess is that the plants are just too stressed.
    I have the same concern, and that's why I took a picture of that leaf. However, my younger Nepenthes also have reddish coloration and they are sprouting pitchers normally. I have a healthy N. ampullaria that is completely bright red, in fact. (Photo below) That is an old leaf, btw. The coloration usually develops over time, and appears harmless to me.

    Quote Originally Posted by dashman View Post
    That can happen. If a nep is nutrient deprived it may not pitcher. Coffee or foliar feeding may do the trick.

    This may be part of the problem, but only 2-3 leaves at a time give me a feeling that something else may be going on here. You may want to do some research on soil, water, light and temp preferences for amps. I have never grown one so can't really help out too much other than to say that 2-3 leaves with no pitchers tells me something is definately wrong.
    I did. There's no universally recommended soil mix. Other parameters are fine, except maybe too much lighting as discussed above.

    Quote Originally Posted by Presto View Post
    You know, it seems like your growing conditions are right on the money. And if they're already at 80-100% humidity, spraying seems a little redundant. My guess is that they're still sulking from the traumas of moving and being sat on by a cat...how long ago were those events?
    Five or six months. All plants were affected, but all the other plants have adapted to the conditions and started growing pitchers.



    ---------- Post added at 10:39 PM ---------- Previous post was at 10:26 PM ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by Dexenthes View Post
    Some people swear by foliar feeding. I personally have no tried it. The coffee treatment method is another one that many grows have started doing. I've tried that once or twice and saw some noticeable effect. That being said, I've seen some people over-do the coffee before too.

    Also, of course, because I suck at Celsius conversion, I just checked and it seems that the day temp for the ampullaria could be as high as 32 Celsius comfortably, with a drop at night of down to maybe 25ish.

    And exo is right, as far as I know ampullaria are not necessarily plants that need to be blasted with light, so the plants are possibly getting too much of it. It makes sense, if they supposedly ingest detritus through their pitchers in the wild, then that would mean they are no strangers to having trees or other shrubs above them.
    The great mystery here is that I have two more N. ampullaria, Harlequin variants, which are growing nicely. The only difference between the two pairs is their age. What is the coffee treatment? Never heard of it. The air temperature in the tank is pretty much what you suggest, between 25 to 30 C. When plants wither from too much sun, either UV light or the extra heat is to blame (as far as I know.) I have a sheet of glass between the metal halide and the plants to keep off the extra heat and absorb the UV. Then again, maybe it's not enough.

    By the way... it has been suggested on another forum that the plants may have entered their vining stage, i.e. they cease to produce pitchers except the infrequent upper pitcher, and that I may expect basal growth soon. What do you think of that?
    Last edited by emre; 01-22-2011 at 08:54 PM.

  4. #12
    wicked good plants! Presto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    1,257
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by emre View Post
    By the way... it has been suggested on another forum that the plants may have entered their vining stage, i.e. they cease to produce pitchers except the infrequent upper pitcher, and that I may expect basal growth soon. What do you think of that?
    That makes sense! And fresh green basals would be more likely to put out pitchers. Hmmmm...I vaguely remember reading a post where somebody gently bent a vine downward in order to encourage basal growth. Maybe something like that could help it along?
    -Emily

  5. #13
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Western New York
    Posts
    18,768
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Maybe I missed the mentioning, but what is their photoperiod? If their getting less than ~11 hours of daylength, Neps do stop pitchering. Just a thought...

  6. #14

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    57
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Presto View Post
    That makes sense! And fresh green basals would be more likely to put out pitchers. Hmmmm...I vaguely remember reading a post where somebody gently bent a vine downward in order to encourage basal growth. Maybe something like that could help it along?
    I've been thinking about this. I could use a large metal ring and force the vine to loop around it, or keep the plant horizontally for a few weeks. Now that we're discussing this, I realise that the guys at the nursery may have cut off the first vining stem to promote basal growth in one of these plants. The plant, apparently, didn't react the way they wanted and sprouted a new stem anyway. (I guess if you have no basal growth in the first place, cutting off the apical stem does nothing.)



    I've also been investigating the coffee method Dexenthes suggested, and I'm planning to caffeinate one of the plants tonight. People say it works wonders. I'll use RO water to prepare some coffee, dilute it 50%, and keep the pot in an inch of coffee for three days. Then I'll flush the pot. Since I have two plants, it will be a controlled experiment of sorts.

    Quote Originally Posted by jimscott View Post
    Maybe I missed the mentioning, but what is their photoperiod? If their getting less than ~11 hours of daylength, Neps do stop pitchering. Just a thought...
    They get 12 hours of light. I very much doubt too little light is the problem.

  7. #15
    Oh, the humanity!! TheFury's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    Posts
    779
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I had my N. ventricosa under 9-10 hours of light over the winter, about 4" away from the lights, and it still pitchered like crazy. I was misting it more or less daily and dropping a few bloodworms in to the pitchers from time to time.

    Of course I don't claim to be a seasoned Nep grower. This is my first and only Nepenthes, and I'm growing it right alongside a number of different species on the same shelf of my grow rack (Drosera, Sarracenia, Utricularia, Pinguicula) - something for which an expert grower of any one of those different species might want to thwack me with a baseball bat. I bought that plant on a whim along with my first ever order of CPs, so I know very little about growing the species. Just thought I'd add to your confusion

  8. #16

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    57
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by TheFury View Post
    I had my N. ventricosa under 9-10 hours of light over the winter, about 4" away from the lights, and it still pitchered like crazy. I was misting it more or less daily and dropping a few bloodworms in to the pitchers from time to time.

    Of course I don't claim to be a seasoned Nep grower. This is my first and only Nepenthes, and I'm growing it right alongside a number of different species on the same shelf of my grow rack (Drosera, Sarracenia, Utricularia, Pinguicula) - something for which an expert grower of any one of those different species might want to thwack me with a baseball bat. I bought that plant on a whim along with my first ever order of CPs, so I know very little about growing the species. Just thought I'd add to your confusion
    Thanks for sharing your experience. I've started the coffee treatment now, I'll post pictures if I see any visible difference. I think the plants are definitely in the vining stage, but it's too early for them to grow basal pitchers yet. I'll have to wait and see.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. My Nep is pitchering
    By PitcherCrab in forum Tropical Pitcher Plants  (Nepenthes)
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 04-22-2010, 06:12 AM
  2. Rafflesiana Not pitchering
    By Dr. Frank Lyons in forum Tropical Pitcher Plants  (Nepenthes)
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 06-22-2006, 01:26 PM
  3. Cephalotus pitchering
    By carnivorkid in forum Pitcher Plants: (Sarracenia, Heliamphora, Darlingtonia, Cephalotus)
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 07-21-2004, 04:13 AM
  4. nepenthes not pitchering
    By carnivorkid in forum Tropical Pitcher Plants  (Nepenthes)
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-01-2004, 02:15 PM
  5. not pitchering
    By hitenryu in forum Tropical Pitcher Plants  (Nepenthes)
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 05-09-2002, 10:52 AM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •