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Thread: Nepenthes ramispina curling leaves?

  1. #9
    jonnyq's Avatar
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    @ Taliesin - Yeah, I'll see if I can switch position in the tray to give it a bit less direct sunshine... Cheers!

    I unpotted it; I was surprised at how very much LFS was in the pot... Pretty tight...

    Right, well, here's how it looked:



    I didn't see anything untoward in the roots, but then I'm not very experienced in looking for problems in Nep roots... Does anyone notice anything than I'm missing?

    I repotted it a bit more loosely in LFSrchid bark...


    Going to reposition it in the tray now...

    ---------- Post added at 01:40 PM ---------- Previous post was at 01:38 PM ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by thez_yo View Post
    Oh, and also Nepenthes ramispina is one of the pickiest plants I have. Even N. jacquelinae will be putting out pitchers while N. ramispina is still contemplating *maybe* putting out leaves, so I wouldn't be too bummed that it's misbehaving.
    Misbehaving is fine; I'm just worried I'm killing it for some reason... I figured this is a good learning experience for me either way... Thx!
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 02-26-2011 at 06:22 PM.

  2. #10
    Taliesin-DS's Avatar
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    Thats not many roots at all imho.
    Did you recently got it ?

    Edit: just read that that was how it looked and not how it looks now :P
    my growlist: http://terraforums.com/forums/showth...306#post976306
    My pics: http://www.flickr.com/photos/taliesin-ds/

    <Exo> @Talie......You are the lord of all things blah....

  3. #11
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    Not to hijack the thread, but I have a similar question. The last few leaves my Nepenthes x ventrata has put out were similarly folded but then straightened out to normal leaves. I just assumed it was the low light/lower temps of the season. Should I be at all concerned? It's pitchering well and the leaves look great after they completely open!
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 02-26-2011 at 06:23 PM. Reason: N. A. - Nepenthes x ventrata, not Ventrata

  4. #12
    Taliesin-DS's Avatar
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    My Nepenthes x ventrata does that when i forget to water it.
    They go back to normal within a few hours after i water it.
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 02-26-2011 at 06:24 PM. Reason: N. A. - not ventrata, Nepenthes x ventrata
    my growlist: http://terraforums.com/forums/showth...306#post976306
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  5. #13
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    Hmm well let's see if I can further the discussion. You have had the plant for about 5 months now? There appears to have been little root growth in that time which is troubling. Nor can I see any active root tips which is also troubling. The plant is without any doubt in my mind showing moisture stress so the question is why...
    It is possible that a plant grown in a low light humid environment might react badly and show these symptoms on a hot dry day and then recover again during the evening, simply from the rapid change from it's normal conditions. I don't believe this is the case here.

    It is possible that there was insufficient water for the plant to take up through the potting mix. Again doesn't appear to be the case.

    It is possible the roots are dead while looking alive. Could be the case as the black roots are hard to tell sometimes if they are alive or dead. The lack of active root tips is an indication that the roots are dead OR the plant has not had the need to grow new roots as it has had plenty of moisture in the past 5 months and not needed any more root mass. (not sure I buy this but you never know). The larger whitish roots though look like they are alive so I am not convinced the roots are all dead.

    It is possible the roots are healthy but there is something within the stem that has caused a disruption of water flow between the roots and the leaves. Particularly right were the old dead leaves were cut off. Perhaps a pathogen got into the stem there and cutting off the vascular tissue?

    So the next step is to decide what to do.
    Several possibilities!
    First I would treat with some systemic fungicide just incase it is a pathogen. I would then bag the plant up to reduce transpiration. I would also make sure the potting mix is moist but not soaking wet. Nepenthes seem to root better when the potting mix is not overly wet and soggy.
    IF the plant leaves unroll and looks like it's recovering I would probably leave it baggeed for a few weeks to see what happens. If it reacts badly to being removed from the bag later OR does not recover within a day or two after first being bagged I would probably go to option 2.

    2. Take a cutting! Where the stem is still clearly green and healthy, cut off the bottom from the top. Next take a look at the cut end and verify there is no brown colored tissue. If there is then there is a big problem. If it is healthy, remove a couple of the lower green leaves and put the cutting into moist(not wet) sphagnum and treat like option one by bagging it up for a month or two.

    Good luck and keep us posted!
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

  6. #14
    jonnyq's Avatar
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    @ Taliesin - Actually, my grammar have been a bit ambiguous... What I meant was that I just unpotted it, i.e. all of the pictures in this thread were taken today. Sorry for the confusion...

    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Paroubek View Post
    Hmm well let's see if I can further the discussion. You have had the plant for about 5 months now? There appears to have been little root growth in that time which is troubling. Nor can I see any active root tips which is also troubling. The plant is without any doubt in my mind showing moisture stress so the question is why...
    It is possible that a plant grown in a low light humid environment might react badly and show these symptoms on a hot dry day and then recover again during the evening, simply from the rapid change from it's normal conditions. I don't believe this is the case here.

    It is possible that there was insufficient water for the plant to take up through the potting mix. Again doesn't appear to be the case.

    It is possible the roots are dead while looking alive. Could be the case as the black roots are hard to tell sometimes if they are alive or dead. The lack of active root tips is an indication that the roots are dead OR the plant has not had the need to grow new roots as it has had plenty of moisture in the past 5 months and not needed any more root mass. (not sure I buy this but you never know). The larger whitish roots though look like they are alive so I am not convinced the roots are all dead.

    It is possible the roots are healthy but there is something within the stem that has caused a disruption of water flow between the roots and the leaves. Particularly right were the old dead leaves were cut off. Perhaps a pathogen got into the stem there and cutting off the vascular tissue?

    So the next step is to decide what to do.
    Several possibilities!
    First I would treat with some systemic fungicide just incase it is a pathogen. I would then bag the plant up to reduce transpiration. I would also make sure the potting mix is moist but not soaking wet. Nepenthes seem to root better when the potting mix is not overly wet and soggy.
    IF the plant leaves unroll and looks like it's recovering I would probably leave it baggeed for a few weeks to see what happens. If it reacts badly to being removed from the bag later OR does not recover within a day or two after first being bagged I would probably go to option 2.

    2. Take a cutting! Where the stem is still clearly green and healthy, cut off the bottom from the top. Next take a look at the cut end and verify there is no brown colored tissue. If there is then there is a big problem. If it is healthy, remove a couple of the lower green leaves and put the cutting into moist(not wet) sphagnum and treat like option one by bagging it up for a month or two.

    Good luck and keep us posted!
    Thank you! Very informative! Alright, on to step 1... will update in a few weeks...

    Thanks, everyone!

  7. #15
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    Sounds good! Not sure I made it very clear or explained why, but ...IF it does not appear to be improving noticeably in the leaf dessication within a few days. You may want to move on to option 2. The reason being if it is indeed being caused by either dead roots OR a pathogen that has moved into the lower portion of the stem. It may be too late in a few weeks to get a healthy tip cutting. Especially if it is a pathogen in the stem. On a positive note though. Small tip cuttings of N. ramispina usually root pretty quickly without much difficulty.

    Hope that helps..

    Tony
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

  8. #16
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    I think Tony has described some very viable options. I would follow his recommendations.

    My question:
    What is the TDS of the water you are using? Most of the leaves appear to be stained with precipitated mineral residue.
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

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