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Thread: roots from stem?

  1. #9
    UnstuckinTime's Avatar
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    Adding a little rooting hormone along the stem probably couldn't hurt. I have a little Nepenthes aristolochiodies that I did this too when i repotted it. I'm not sure if it helped, to be honest, but I'm sure it didn't hurt.
    "The plants you grow, end up growing you."


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    dsrtfox1942's Avatar
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    Well, rather than disturbing the roots again, I'm gonna leave it and see how they like it. I emailed Peter D' Amato to see what his response would be. Here is his answer.

    "If happy and mature, nepenthes generally produce shoots near the base of the plant as the stem grows and turns brown in it's lower parts. If it's not doing this, the stem may not be long enough, or it needs applications of foliar fertilizers such as maxsea. Never cut away a grow point on a stem until you have new shoots at the bottom. (See my book The Savage Garden for all these points). Also some nepenthes are naturally bushy, others may not be so leafy."

    I emailed him back to see if leaving the stem under soil would have any negative effects. I will post his response when he gets back to me.
    Joshua from PA
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    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
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    I've been able to get relatively mature plants from cuttings as well as from the emergence of basal nodes myself. I think it all depends on how mature and healthy the plant is overall before you cut. Likewise I don't always wait for basals before taking cuttings - I'm confident enough in my ability rooting cuttings that I'm not worried about losing the rootstock if it doesn't produce new growth. But those are good cautions - I'm probably more of an exception to the rule. I've generally waited at least two to three years before attempting cuttings, and only propagate plants that have been growing consistently and vigorously. Cutting from a vine that still has plenty of green stem and healthy leaves beneath the cut is relatively safe; it's when you cut all of the green parts off and only leave brown, woody stem that you're really risking losing the rootstock. The plant needs to be able to photosynthesize in order to recover, otherwise it will just be working with the energy it has stored in the stem, which will almost certainly limit the size of the new nodes it produces and result in setbacks. I think Peter's answer may be a relatively conservative one.
    ~Joe
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  4. #12
    UnstuckinTime's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by seedjar View Post
    ...it's when you cut all of the green parts off and only leave brown, woody stem that you're really risking losing the rootstock. The plant needs to be able to photosynthesize in order to recover, otherwise it will just be working with the energy it has stored in the stem, which will almost certainly limit the size of the new nodes it produces and result in setbacks...

    Throwing in my two cents: Interestingly enough, i cut off the top of my Nepenthes talengensis because I wanted to root it closer to the ground (In and among some live LFS, you see) and when i repotted the rootstock, it had a very healthy root system, and the brown woody stem promptly sent out two new meristems. Keep in mind that this plant hasnt pitchered in i dont know how long, its just been photosynthesizing.
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    dsrtfox1942's Avatar
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    Peter responded today. Here is what he had to say;

    "I don't think burying the brown lower stems will harm the plant, however usually when new shoots appear it's just at the soil surface, so hopefully the plant will adjust to this......Seeya. Peter at..."
    Joshua from PA
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  6. #14
    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by UnstuckinTime View Post
    Throwing in my two cents: Interestingly enough, i cut off the top of my Nepenthes talengensis because I wanted to root it closer to the ground (In and among some live LFS, you see) and when i repotted the rootstock, it had a very healthy root system, and the brown woody stem promptly sent out two new meristems. Keep in mind that this plant hasnt pitchered in i dont know how long, its just been photosynthesizing.
    I've often observed this as well, which is why I don't believe that you must wait for basals before topping a plant as Peter says. However, it depends a lot on how healthy the plant is, what its root structure is like, how it likes the conditions you're providing, etc. I think the biggest problem is that a lot of beginners are impatient because Nepenthes can be particularly slow growers, and they'll cut when their plant isn't ready. Truly mature Nepenthes are quite resilient in my experience, but to start out with plants available at nurseries, which are really still babies in most cases, you might think they're all made of glass.
    ~Joe
    o//~ Livin' like a bug ain't easy / My old clothes don't seem to fit me /
    I got little tiny bug feet / I don't really know what bugs eat /
    Don't want no one steppin' on me / Now I'm sympathizin' with fleas /
    Livin' like a bug ain't easy / Livin' like a bug ain't easy... o//~

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